Mental health services planning for G20 summit in Brisbane and assessment of impact

Emmerson, Brett, Praskova, Anna, Fawcett, Lisa, Crompton, David and Heffernan, Edward (2017) Mental health services planning for G20 summit in Brisbane and assessment of impact. Australasian Psychiatry, 25 1: 60-65. doi:10.1177/1039856216671653


Author Emmerson, Brett
Praskova, Anna
Fawcett, Lisa
Crompton, David
Heffernan, Edward
Title Mental health services planning for G20 summit in Brisbane and assessment of impact
Journal name Australasian Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1665
1039-8562
Publication date 2017-03-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1039856216671653
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 25
Issue 1
Start page 60
End page 65
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject 2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Objective: The objective of this study was to inform planning for similar events, our aim was to describe planning undertaken by Brisbane Mental Health Services for the 2014 G20 Summit and the impact of the Summit on service use. Methods: We analysed routinely collected service data comparing presentations and discharges for the same time period in two consecutive years. Results: While presentations to mental health services increased from the previous year across a five-month period (including the month of G20), the week of the G20 Summit showed little change. Conclusions: Our findings will be useful to other services that prepare for major events, such as G20. Our experience shows that, with detailed planning and extra resources, the G20 Summit passed without any major mental health incidents or major increase for mental health presentations.
Formatted abstract
Objective: The objective of this study was to inform planning for similar events, our aim was to describe planning undertaken by Brisbane Mental Health Services for the 2014 G20 Summit and the impact of the Summit on service use.

Methods: We analysed routinely collected service data comparing presentations and discharges for the same time period in two consecutive years.

Results: While presentations to mental health services increased from the previous year across a five-month period (including the month of G20), the week of the G20 Summit showed little change.

Conclusions: Our findings will be useful to other services that prepare for major events, such as G20. Our experience shows that, with detailed planning and extra resources, the G20 Summit passed without any major mental health incidents or major increase for mental health presentations.
Keyword Brisbane
G20
Mental health service
Mental health service demand
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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