Engaging prisoners in education: Reducing risk and recidivism

Farley, Helen and Pike, Anne (2016) Engaging prisoners in education: Reducing risk and recidivism. Advancing Corrections, 1 1: 65-73.

Author Farley, Helen
Pike, Anne
Title Engaging prisoners in education: Reducing risk and recidivism
Journal name Advancing Corrections
ISSN 2517-9233
Publication date 2016-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 65
End page 73
Total pages 9
Place of publication Beernem, Belgium
Publisher International Corrections and Prisons Association
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Engaging prisoners in education is one of a range of measures that could alleviate security risk in prisons. For prisoners, one of the main challenges with incarceration is monotony, often leading to frustration, raising the risk of injury for staff and other prisoners. This article suggests that prisoner engagement in education may help to alleviate security risk in prisons through relieving monotony and reducing re-offending by promoting critical thinking skills. It discusses some of the challenges to accessing higher levels of education in prisons and argues that if education was considered for its risk-reducing potential and measured accordingly, then some of those challenges could be reduced. It concludes with a discussion of projects undertaken in Australia and the UK that introduce digital technologies into prisons to allow greater access to the self-paced higher levels of education which could help realize the benefits of reduced risk and decreased recidivism rates.
Keyword prison
higher education
risk
corrections
social inclusion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Fri, 17 Mar 2017, 12:06:44 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry