Modulation of leg joint function to produce emulated acceleration during walking and running in humans

Farris, Dominic and Raiteri, Brent (2017) Modulation of leg joint function to produce emulated acceleration during walking and running in humans. Royal Society Open Science, 4 3: 160901. doi:10.1098/rsos.160901

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Author Farris, Dominic
Raiteri, Brent
Title Modulation of leg joint function to produce emulated acceleration during walking and running in humans
Journal name Royal Society Open Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2054-5703
Publication date 2017-03-08
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rsos.160901
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 4
Issue 3
Start page 160901
Total pages 13
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1000 General
Abstract Understanding how humans adapt gait mechanics for a wide variety of locomotor tasks is important for inspiring the design of robotic, prosthetic and wearable assistive devices. We aimed to elicit the mechanical adjustments made to leg joint functions that are required to generate accelerative walking and running, using metrics with direct relevance to device design. Twelve healthy male participants completed constant speed (CS) walking and running and emulated acceleration (ACC) trials on an instrumented treadmill. External force and motion capture data were combined in an inverse dynamics analysis. Ankle, knee and hip joint mechanics were described and compared using angles, moments, powers and normalized functional indexes that described each joint as relatively more: spring, motor, damper or strut-like. To accelerate using a walking gait, the ankle joint was switched from predominantly spring-like to motor-like, while the hip joint was maintained as a motor, with an increase in hip motor-like function. Accelerating while running involved no change in the primary function of any leg joint, but involved high levels of spring and motor-like function at the hip and ankle joints. Mechanical adjustments for ACC walking were achieved primarily via altered limb positioning, but ACC running needed greater joint moments.
Keyword Insect Science
Animal Science and Zoology
Aquatic Science
Physiology
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Molecular Biology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Mar 2017, 10:17:06 EST by Dominic James Farris on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences