Experience-induced preference for oviposition repellents derived from a non-host plant by a specialist herbivore

Liu, S. S, Li, Y. H., Liu, Y. Q. and Zalucki, M. P. (2005) Experience-induced preference for oviposition repellents derived from a non-host plant by a specialist herbivore. Ecology Letters, 8 7: 722-729. doi:10.1111/j.1461-0248.2005.00776.x


Author Liu, S. S
Li, Y. H.
Liu, Y. Q.
Zalucki, M. P.
Title Experience-induced preference for oviposition repellents derived from a non-host plant by a specialist herbivore
Journal name Ecology Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1461-023X
Publication date 2005-01-01
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2005.00776.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 8
Issue 7
Start page 722
End page 729
Total pages 8
Editor A. Boyd-Squires
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 270799 Ecology and Evolution not elsewhere classified
620502 Horticultural crops
C1
Abstract Foraging adults of phytophagous insects are attracted by host-plant volatiles and supposedly repelled by volatiles from non-host plants. In behavioural control of pest insects, chemicals derived from non-host plants applied to crops are expected to repel searching adults and thereby reduce egg laying. How experience by searching adults of non-host volatiles affects their subsequent searching and oviposition behaviour has been rarely tested. In laboratory experiments, we examined the effect of experience of a non-host-plant extract on the oviposition behaviour of the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, a specialist herbivore of cruciferous plants. Naive ovipositing DBM females were repelled by an extract of dried leaves of Chrysanthemum morifolium, a non-host plant of DBM, but experienced females were not repelled. Instead they were attracted by host plants treated with the non-host-plant extract and laid a higher proportion of eggs on treated than on untreated host plants. Such behavioural changes induced by experience could lead to host-plant range expansion in phytophagous insects and play an important role in determining outcome for pest management of some behavioural manipulation methods.
Keyword Ecology
Behavioural Control
Brassica Campestris
Chrysanthemum Morifolium
Host Range Expansion
Plutella Xylostella
Semiochemicals
Host-range Expansion
Plutella-xylostella L
Diamondback Moth
Culex-quinquefasciatus
Olfactory Recognition
Phytophagous Insects
Prolonged Exposure
Feeding Deterrents
Volatiles
Lepidoptera
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 01:15:44 EST