Prescribing patterns of analgesics and other medicines by dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012

Hollingworth, Samantha A., Chan, Ryan, Pham, Jenny, Shi, Sonya and Ford, Pauline J. (2017) Prescribing patterns of analgesics and other medicines by dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 45 4: 303-309. doi:10.1111/cdoe.12291


Author Hollingworth, Samantha A.
Chan, Ryan
Pham, Jenny
Shi, Sonya
Ford, Pauline J.
Title Prescribing patterns of analgesics and other medicines by dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012
Journal name Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1600-0528
0301-5661
Publication date 2017-02-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/cdoe.12291
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 45
Issue 4
Start page 303
End page 309
Total pages 7
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 3500 Dentistry
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Objectives: Dental practitioners are able to prescribe a variety of medicines subsidized on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Schedule (PBS), the main categories of which are analgesics and antibiotics. We aimed to investigate the patterns of PBS prescribing of non-antimicrobial medicines by dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012. Methods: Data were collected from Medicare Australia on prescriptions from dental practitioners dispensed to concessional beneficiaries between 2001 and 2012. We examined patterns of use over time. Results: There was an overall increase in number of prescriptions and in dispensed use (standardized by dose and population) of analgesic medicines for the concessional population over the 12-years period. The use of dentally prescribed analgesics increased 15%, with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increasing by 41% and opioid analgesics by 12%. Prescribing of the oxycodone 5-mg tablet increased 344% between 2005 and 2012, and dental prescription of the benzodiazepines diazepam and temazepam increased by 51% and 229%, respectively, over the observation period. Injectable corticosteroid use increased by 19%. Conversely, use of carbamazepine and anti-emetics decreased by 39% and 10%, respectively. Conclusions: Dental prescribing of analgesics, anti-inflammatories and benzodiazepines in the concessional population has increased significantly over the past decade. These data can form the baseline to further examine appropriate medicine use in the management of dental conditions.
Formatted abstract
Objectives: Dental practitioners are able to prescribe a variety of medicines subsidized on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Schedule (PBS), the main categories of which are analgesics and antibiotics. We aimed to investigate the patterns of PBS prescribing of non-antimicrobial medicines by dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012.

Methods: Data were collected from Medicare Australia on prescriptions from dental practitioners dispensed to concessional beneficiaries between 2001 and 2012. We examined patterns of use over time.

Results: There was an overall increase in number of prescriptions and in dispensed use (standardized by dose and population) of analgesic medicines for the concessional population over the 12-years period. The use of dentally prescribed analgesics increased 15%, with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increasing by 41% and opioid analgesics by 12%. Prescribing of the oxycodone 5-mg tablet increased 344% between 2005 and 2012, and dental prescription of the benzodiazepines diazepam and temazepam increased by 51% and 229%, respectively, over the observation period. Injectable corticosteroid use increased by 19%. Conversely, use of carbamazepine and anti-emetics decreased by 39% and 10%, respectively.

Conclusions: Dental prescribing of analgesics, anti-inflammatories and benzodiazepines in the concessional population has increased significantly over the past decade. These data can form the baseline to further examine appropriate medicine use in the management of dental conditions.
Keyword Analgesics
Benzodiazepines
Dental prescribing
NSAIDs
Opioids
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Dentistry Publications
 
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