Twelve-Year television viewing time trajectories and physical function in older adults

Reid, Natasha, Healy, Genevieve N., Daly, Robin M., Baker, Peter, Eakin, Elizabeth G., Dunstan, David W., Owen, Neville and Gardiner, Paul A. (2017) Twelve-Year television viewing time trajectories and physical function in older adults. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 49 7: 1359-1365. doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000001243


Author Reid, Natasha
Healy, Genevieve N.
Daly, Robin M.
Baker, Peter
Eakin, Elizabeth G.
Dunstan, David W.
Owen, Neville
Gardiner, Paul A.
Title Twelve-Year television viewing time trajectories and physical function in older adults
Journal name Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1530-0315
0195-9131
Publication date 2017-07-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001243
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 49
Issue 7
Start page 1359
End page 1365
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 2732 Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
3612 Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Abstract Introduction: The purposes of this study were to identify trajectories of older adults' television viewing (TV) time for 12 yr and to examine their associations with performance-based measures of physical function. Methods: Data on TV time (h.wk(-1)) and sociodemographic factors were collected at each assessment of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (1999/2000, 2004/2005, and 2011/2012), with objective measures of physical function (2.44 m timed up and go [TUG, s] and knee extensor strength [KES, kg] tests) collected at the final (2011/2012) assessment. Regression analyses examined predictors of trajectory membership and associations with TUG and KES in those 60+ yr of age in 2011/2012. Results: Six TV time trajectories were identified among the 1938 participants (age, 60-97 yr; 54% female): consistently low (9.7%), low-increasing (22.3%), moderate-decreasing (13.5%), moderate-increasing (30.3%), consistently high (18.9%), and high-increasing (5.2%). There were no statistically significant relationships with TUG (P > 0.05). In the fully adjusted model, KES performance was significantly better in the consistently low, low-increasing, and consistently high trajectories, compared with the moderate-increasing trajectory (P < 0.001, R-2 = 0.33). Conclusion: Twelve-year trajectories of TV time were associated with muscle strength in older adults. These findings suggest that patterns of sedentary behavior can be a determinant of muscle strength in later life.
Formatted abstract
Introduction:The purpose of this study was to identify trajectories of older adults’ television viewing (TV) time over 12 years; and, to examine their associations with performance-based measures of physical function.

Methods: Data on TV time (hours/week-1) and socio-demographic factors were collected at each assessment of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) Study (1999/2000; 2004/2005; 2011/2012), with objective measures of physical function (2.44m timed-up-and-go [TUG, seconds] and knee extensor test [KES, kg]) collected at the final (2011/2012) assessment. Regression analyses examined predictors of trajectory membership and associations with TUG and KES in those aged 60+ years in 2011/2012.

Results: Six TV time trajectories were identified among the 1938 participants (aged 60-97, 54% female): consistently-low (9.7%); low-increasing (22.3%); moderate-decreasing (13.5%); moderate-increasing (30.3%); consistently-high (18.9%); and, high-increasing (5.2%). There were no statistically significant relationships with TUG (P>0.05). In the fully adjusted model, KES performance was significantly better in the consistently-low, low-increasing and consistently- high trajectories, compared to the moderate-increasing trajectory (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.33).

Conclusion: 12-year trajectories of TV time were associated with muscle strength in older adults. These findings suggest that patterns of sedentary behavior can be a determinant of muscle strength in later life.
Keyword Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 566940
1057608
108029
233200
1003960
1078360
Institutional Status UQ

 
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