Perspectives of patients and family members regarding psychological support using intensive care diaries: an exploratory mixed methods study

Aitken, Leanne M., Rattray, Janice, Kenardy, Justin, Hull, Alastair M., Ullman, Amanda J., Le Brocque, Robyne, Mitchell, Marion, Davis, Chelsea, Castillo, Maria I. and Macfarlane, Bonnie (2017) Perspectives of patients and family members regarding psychological support using intensive care diaries: an exploratory mixed methods study. Journal of Critical Care, 38 263-268. doi:10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.12.003

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Author Aitken, Leanne M.
Rattray, Janice
Kenardy, Justin
Hull, Alastair M.
Ullman, Amanda J.
Le Brocque, Robyne
Mitchell, Marion
Davis, Chelsea
Castillo, Maria I.
Macfarlane, Bonnie
Title Perspectives of patients and family members regarding psychological support using intensive care diaries: an exploratory mixed methods study
Journal name Journal of Critical Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1557-8615
0883-9441
Publication date 2017-04-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.12.003
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 38
Start page 263
End page 268
Total pages 6
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher W.B. Saunders
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Diaries summarizing intensive care are routine practice in some countries, although evidence to support diary use is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify whether distress post-intensive care influences patients’ and relatives’ choice as to whether they would like to receive a diary and what information delivery method is preferred.

Materials and methods: Intensive care patients admitted for at least 3 days and their relatives participated in an exploratory mixed methods study. Interviews were conducted 3 to 5 months after discharge. Psychological distress was assessed using Kessler-10 and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Checklist − 5. Perceptions of benefit of diaries were assessed using a 4-point Likert scale. Differences were examined using Fisher exact test (P < .05).

Results: Fifty-seven patients and 22 relatives consented to participation, with 22 patients and 22 relatives interviewed before data saturation. Psychological distress was evident in 25 (47%) patients and 5 (23%) relatives. Participants’ psychological health was similar for those who perceived diaries as beneficial, and those who did not. Themes included memory, process, and impact, although opinions were diverse.

Conclusions: Patient and relative preferences of receiving a diary are not related to psychological distress. Diverse opinions around common themes suggest the need for a range of interventions to aid psychological recovery.
Keyword Anxiety
Depression
Intensive care
Intensive care diaries
Posttraumatic stress
Recovery
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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