Interpersonal emotion regulation in the workplace: a conceptual and operational review and future research agenda

Troth, Ashlea C., Lawrence, Sandra A., Jordan, Peter J. and Ashkanasy, Neal M. (2017) Interpersonal emotion regulation in the workplace: a conceptual and operational review and future research agenda. International Journal of Management Reviews, . doi:10.1111/ijmr.12144


Author Troth, Ashlea C.
Lawrence, Sandra A.
Jordan, Peter J.
Ashkanasy, Neal M.
Title Interpersonal emotion regulation in the workplace: a conceptual and operational review and future research agenda
Journal name International Journal of Management Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1460-8545
1468-2370
Publication date 2017-04-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ijmr.12144
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 21
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Employees need to regulate their own emotions as well as the emotions of others to enhance the quality of interactions with their colleagues. How well this is achieved has important outcomes for both employees and the organisations in which they work. In the field of organisational science, however, differing approaches have emerged regarding the conceptualisation and operationalisation of emotionregulation (ER) particularly in terms of interpersonal interactions. In the present review, we examine contemporary theoretical perspectives of ER and its measurement with a view to resolving the confusion that currently exists around interpersonal ER in a workplace context. To understand how this field of research has developed so diversely, we begin by demonstrating the influence of three major individual-level ER models on interpersonallevel approaches: (1) the ER process model; (2) emotional labor and (3) emotional intelligence. Moreover, to make sense of the range of interpersonal-level research underpinned by these theories, we present a 2 x 2 categorisation, developed by Zaki and Williams (2013), that shows how workplace researchers have variously approached interpersonal ER as an intrinsic versus extrinsic process, with activation of either responsedependent or response-independent categories. This categorisation broadly shows interpersonal ER theory utilised in work contexts tends to fall into four groupings as: (1) a purely extrinsic process, (2) a differentiation of extrinsic interpersonal from intrinsic individual ER, (3) co-occurring intrinsic and extrinsic interpersonal ER, or (4) interpersonal coregulation. We also discuss the measurement of interpersonal ER and conclude by highlighting emerging research directions.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes This research is supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Grant: DP130102625. Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Mon, 13 Mar 2017, 15:09:25 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School