Review: Amylopectin synthesis and hydrolysis – understanding isoamylase and limit dextrinase and their impact on starch structure on barley (Hordeum vulgare) quality

Gous, Peter W. and Fox, Glen P. (2017) Review: Amylopectin synthesis and hydrolysis – understanding isoamylase and limit dextrinase and their impact on starch structure on barley (Hordeum vulgare) quality. Trends in Food Science and Technology, 62 23-32. doi:10.1016/j.tifs.2016.11.013

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Gous, Peter W.
Fox, Glen P.
Title Review: Amylopectin synthesis and hydrolysis – understanding isoamylase and limit dextrinase and their impact on starch structure on barley (Hordeum vulgare) quality
Formatted title
Review: Amylopectin synthesis and hydrolysis – understanding isoamylase and limit dextrinase and their impact on starch structure on barley (Hordeum vulgare) quality
Journal name Trends in Food Science and Technology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0924-2244
1879-3053
Publication date 2017-04-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.tifs.2016.11.013
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 62
Start page 23
End page 32
Total pages 10
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Starch contributes to barley grain and malt quality which in turn contributes to beer quality and flavour; through fermentable sugar profiles, rates of fermentation and Mallard reactions. Both amylopectin and amylose are enzymatically degraded to release maltose, maltotriose and higher order sugars.

Scope and approach: Amylopectin is highly branched [α-(1 → 6) glycoside bond branch points] with numerous short branches while amylose is a long chained polymer with a few side branches. During grain development, the final level of branching is controlled by two enzymes namely; isoamylase and limit dextrinase (LD). Mutations in either of these genes can also result in changes to structure, content, and granule formation and size. During the malting free LD will to cleave the α-(1 → 6) bonds but during mashing processes, bound LD is release, resulting in chains of various length available for other starch degrading enzymes to hydrolyse.

Findings and conclusions: While there is a good understanding of most of the individual aspects in amylopectin formation, structure and degradation; the story remains incomplete, as most of this understanding has been gained from experiments with only a limited number of barley varieties, limitations in the technology for structural measurement, and since no data is available to link structure to fermentable sugar profiles.
Keyword Amylopectin
Barley
Brewing
Isoamylase
Limit dextrinase
Malting quality
Starch structure
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 07 Mar 2017, 00:20:21 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)