Combined aerobic and resistance training effects on glucose homeostasis, fitness, and other major health indices: a review of current guidelines

Johannsen, Neil M., Swift, Damon L., Lavie, Carl J., Earnest, Conrad P., Blair, Steven N. and Church, Timothy S. (2016) Combined aerobic and resistance training effects on glucose homeostasis, fitness, and other major health indices: a review of current guidelines. Sports Medicine, 46 12: 1809-1818. doi:10.1007/s40279-016-0548-3


Author Johannsen, Neil M.
Swift, Damon L.
Lavie, Carl J.
Earnest, Conrad P.
Blair, Steven N.
Church, Timothy S.
Title Combined aerobic and resistance training effects on glucose homeostasis, fitness, and other major health indices: a review of current guidelines
Journal name Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0112-1642
1179-2035
Publication date 2016-12-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1007/s40279-016-0548-3
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 46
Issue 12
Start page 1809
End page 1818
Total pages 10
Place of publication Auckland,New Zealand
Publisher Adis International
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract The combination of aerobic and resistance training (AER + RES) is recommended by almost every major organization to improve health-related risk factors associated with sedentary behavior. Since the release of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans in 2008, several large well-controlled trials and ancillary reports have been published that provide further insight into the effects of AER + RES on health-related outcomes. The current manuscript examines the literature on the effects of AER + RES on major clinical outcomes, including glucose homeostasis, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and muscular strength, as well as other important clinical outcomes, including metabolic syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and quality of life. Collectively, research suggests that AER + RES and AER or RES alone improves glycemic control and insulin sensitivity compared with continued sedentary behavior. Significant changes in CRF are also observed, suggesting a reduction in cardiovascular disease-related mortality risk. Reduced adiposity, especially abdominal adiposity, and increased strength may also interact with CRF to promote additional health benefits associated with AER + RES. While findings from our review support current physical activity guidelines, a paucity of research limits the generalizability of the results.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Medicine Publications
 
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