Parental history of type 2 diabetes, TCF7L2 variant and lower insulin secretion are associated with incident hypertension. Data from the DESIR and RISC cohorts

Bonnet, Fabrice, Roussel, Ronan, Natali, Andrea, Cauchi, Stephane, Petrie, John, Laville, Martine, Yengo, Loic, Froguel, Philippe, Lange, Celine, Lantieri, Olivier, Marre, Michel, Balkau, Beverley and Ferrannini, Ele (2013) Parental history of type 2 diabetes, TCF7L2 variant and lower insulin secretion are associated with incident hypertension. Data from the DESIR and RISC cohorts. Diabetologia, 56 11: 2414-2423. doi:10.1007/s00125-013-3021-y


Author Bonnet, Fabrice
Roussel, Ronan
Natali, Andrea
Cauchi, Stephane
Petrie, John
Laville, Martine
Yengo, Loic
Froguel, Philippe
Lange, Celine
Lantieri, Olivier
Marre, Michel
Balkau, Beverley
Ferrannini, Ele
Title Parental history of type 2 diabetes, TCF7L2 variant and lower insulin secretion are associated with incident hypertension. Data from the DESIR and RISC cohorts
Formatted title
Parental history of type 2 diabetes, TCF7L2 variant and lower insulin secretion are associated with incident hypertension. Data from the DESIR and RISC cohorts
Journal name Diabetologia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0012-186X
1432-0428
Publication date 2013-11-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00125-013-3021-y
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 56
Issue 11
Start page 2414
End page 2423
Total pages 10
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aims/hypothesis
The relationship between insulin secretion and the incidence of hypertension has not been well characterised. We hypothesised that both a parental history of diabetes and TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism, which increases susceptibility to diabetes because of impaired beta cell function, are associated with incident hypertension. In a separate cohort, we assessed whether low insulin secretion is related to incident hypertension.

Methods
Nine year incident hypertension was studied in 2,391 normotensive participants from the Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR) cohort. The relationship between insulin secretion and 3 year incident hypertension was investigated in 1,047 non-diabetic, normotensive individuals from the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease (RISC) cohort. Insulin secretion during OGTT was expressed in relation to the degree of insulin resistance, as assessed by a hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamp.

Results
In the DESIR cohort, a parental history of diabetes and the TCF7L2 at-risk variant were both associated with hypertension incidence at year 9, independently of waist circumference, BP, fasting glucose, insulin levels and HOMA-IR at inclusion (p = 0.02 for parental history, p = 0.006 for TCF7L2). In the RISC cohort, a lower insulin secretion rate during the OGTT at baseline was associated with both higher BP and a greater risk of hypertension at year 3. This inverse correlation between the insulin secretion rate and incident hypertension persisted after controlling for baseline insulin resistance, glycaemia and BP (p = 0.007).

Conclusions/interpretation
Parental history of diabetes, TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism and a reduced insulin secretion rate were consistently associated with incident hypertension. A low insulin secretion rate might be a new risk factor for incident hypertension, beyond insulin resistance.
Keyword Hypertension
Insulin secretion
Parental history of diabetes
TCF7L2
Type 2 diabetes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID QLG1-CT-2001-01252
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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