Tackling health workforce shortages during antiretroviral treatment scale-up-experiences from ethiopia and Malawi

Rasschaert, Freya, Philips, Mit, Van Leemput, Luc, Assefa, Yibeltal, Schouten, Erik and Van Damme, Wim (2011) Tackling health workforce shortages during antiretroviral treatment scale-up-experiences from ethiopia and Malawi. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 57 SUPPL 2: S109-S112. doi:10.1097/QAI.0b013e31821f9b69


Author Rasschaert, Freya
Philips, Mit
Van Leemput, Luc
Assefa, Yibeltal
Schouten, Erik
Van Damme, Wim
Title Tackling health workforce shortages during antiretroviral treatment scale-up-experiences from ethiopia and Malawi
Journal name Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1525-4135
1944-7884
Publication date 2011-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/QAI.0b013e31821f9b69
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 57
Issue SUPPL 2
Start page S109
End page S112
Total pages 4
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract In many sub-Saharan countries, the health workforce shortage has been a major constraint in the scale-up of antiretroviral treatment. This human resource crisis has led to profound adjustments of the antiretroviral treatment care delivery model in several countries in the region. It also inspired some governments to take swift measures to substantially increase human resources capacity. This article draws on the experience of Malawi and Ethiopia, which have been able to successfully increase their health workforce over a relatively short period, allowing scaling up of antiretroviral treatment. Additional international HIV funding and strong political commitment made possible this exceptional response. Both countries implemented a combination of measures to tackle the human resource crisis: the delegation of medical and administrative tasks to lower health cadres and lay workers, the introduction of new health cadres, the reinforcement of preservice training, and improving health staff remuneration. In particular, the involvement of community and lay health workers in HIV-related service delivery substantially increased the health workforce. The involvement of lay cadres has important long-term implications. To sustain results, continued political commitment, ongoing training and supervision to maintain quality of care, and strategies to avoid attrition among lay cadres will be essential. Although task shifting and involvement of lay cadres allowed bridging of the human resource gap in a short time, other strategies have to be considered simultaneously, and all interventions must be maintained over a longer period to yield results.
Keyword ART
Community health workers
Ethiopia
Human resources
Malawi
Task shifting
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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