Occupational experience of caregiving during driving disruption following an acquired brain injury

Liang, Phyllis, Fleming, Jennifer, Gustafsson, Louise and Liddle, Jacki (2017) Occupational experience of caregiving during driving disruption following an acquired brain injury. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 80 1: 30-38. doi:10.1177/0308022616668359


Author Liang, Phyllis
Fleming, Jennifer
Gustafsson, Louise
Liddle, Jacki
Title Occupational experience of caregiving during driving disruption following an acquired brain injury
Journal name British Journal of Occupational Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1477-6006
0308-0226
Publication date 2017-02-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0308022616668359
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 80
Issue 1
Start page 30
End page 38
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Abstract Introduction: Caregiving associated with driving disruption following an acquired brain injury is challenging and impacts on family members' daily lives. However, little is known about the activities and meaning behind the occupation of a family member providing care during driving disruption.
Formatted abstract
Introduction
Caregiving associated with driving disruption following an acquired brain injury is challenging and impacts on family members’ daily lives. However, little is known about the activities and meaning behind the occupation of a family member providing care during driving disruption.

Method
A prospective longitudinal design with a phenomenological approach was used as part of a larger study exploring family members’ needs and experiences. Forty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 family members over a 6-month period. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Results
The occupational experiences related to caregiving during driving disruption emerged as a key finding. The meaning and activities comprising the caregiving occupation during driving disruption are captured in three themes: (1) More than just driving; (2) The invisible and undervalued care and (3) Being a therapist at home. Family members highlighted the challenges of managing broader and multiple responsibilities.

Conclusion

The lived experiences, perceived meaning and activities involved in the caregiver occupation during driving disruption extend beyond just transport provision. Family members require support for occupational engagement and satisfaction at this key time. Rehabilitation and support for the person after an acquired brain injury may also improve the occupational experiences of family members.
Keyword Automobile driving
Domain of concern
Family
Occupation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 28 Feb 2017, 09:06:09 EST by Kirstie Asmussen on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)