The course and correlates of combat-related PTSD in Australian Vietnam veterans in the three decades after the war

O'Toole, Brian I. and Catts, Stanley V. (2017) The course and correlates of combat-related PTSD in Australian Vietnam veterans in the three decades after the war. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 30 1: 27-35. doi:10.1002/jts.22160


Author O'Toole, Brian I.
Catts, Stanley V.
Title The course and correlates of combat-related PTSD in Australian Vietnam veterans in the three decades after the war
Journal name Journal of Traumatic Stress   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1573-6598
0894-9867
Publication date 2017-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jts.22160
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 30
Issue 1
Start page 27
End page 35
Total pages 9
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Australian male Vietnam veterans (N = 388) were assessed 22 and 36 years after their return to Australia using standardized diagnostic interviews, with added data from Army records and self-report questionnaires. Among veterans who ever had posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 50.3% had a current diagnosis at the second assessment; of those who had a current diagnosis at Wave 1, 46.9% were also current at Wave 2. Late onset occurred for 19.0% of veterans, of whom 60.8% were current at Wave 2. Multivariate analysis compared veterans with no history of PTSD (n = 231) with veterans who had ever had PTSD (n = 157) to assess risk factors for PTSD incidence; and veterans with a history, but not current PTSD (n = 78) with veterans who had current PTSD at the second assessment (n = 79) to assess risk factors for failure to remit. Incidence was associated with lower education, shorter Army training predeployment, higher combat, excess drinking, and help-seeking after return to Australia. Prevalence was associated with having a father who saw combat in World War II, being injured in battle, having a lower intelligence test score, experiencing higher combat, and having a diagnosis of phobia at the first assessment. Only combat was common to incidence and prevalence.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 28 Feb 2017, 00:20:24 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)