Live birth in an archosauromorph reptile

Liu, Jun, Organ, Chris L., Benton, Michael J., Brandley, Matthew C. and Aitchison, Jonathan C. (2017) Live birth in an archosauromorph reptile. Nature Communications, 8 14445: 14445. doi:10.1038/ncomms14445


Author Liu, Jun
Organ, Chris L.
Benton, Michael J.
Brandley, Matthew C.
Aitchison, Jonathan C.
Title Live birth in an archosauromorph reptile
Journal name Nature Communications   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2041-1723
Publication date 2017-02-14
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ncomms14445
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 14445
Start page 14445
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 1600 Chemistry
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
3100 Physics and Astronomy
Abstract Live birth has evolved many times independently in vertebrates, such as mammals and diverse groups of lizards and snakes. However, live birth is unknown in the major clade Archosauromorpha, a group that first evolved some 260 million years ago and is represented today by birds and crocodilians. Here we report the discovery of a pregnant long-necked marine reptile (Dinocephalosaurus) from the Middle Triassic (1/4245 million years ago) of southwest China showing live birth in archosauromorphs. Our discovery pushes back evidence of reproductive biology in the clade by roughly 50 million years, and shows that there is no fundamental reason that archosauromorphs could not achieve live birth. Our phylogenetic models indicate that Dinocephalosaurus determined the sex of their offspring by sex chromosomes rather than by environmental temperature like crocodilians. Our results provide crucial evidence for genotypic sex determination facilitating land-water transitions in amniotes.
Formatted abstract
Live birth has evolved many times independently in vertebrates, such as mammals and diverse groups of lizards and snakes. However, live birth is unknown in the major clade Archosauromorpha, a group that first evolved some 260 million years ago and is represented today by birds and crocodilians. Here we report the discovery of a pregnant long-necked marine reptile (Dinocephalosaurus) from the Middle Triassic (∼245 million years ago) of southwest China showing live birth in archosauromorphs. Our discovery pushes back evidence of reproductive biology in the clade by roughly 50 million years, and shows that there is no fundamental reason that archosauromorphs could not achieve live birth. Our phylogenetic models indicate that Dinocephalosaurus determined the sex of their offspring by sex chromosomes rather than by environmental temperature like crocodilians. Our results provide crucial evidence for genotypic sex determination facilitating land-water transitions in amniotes.
Keyword Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 41402015
143104
1508085QD70
2014HGQC0026
12120114068001
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Publications
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Created: Tue, 28 Feb 2017, 00:20:24 EST by Web Cron on behalf of School of Earth and Environmental Sciences