Prescribing patterns of dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012. Antimicrobials

Ford, P. J., Saladine, C., Zhang, K. and Hollingworth, S. A. (2017) Prescribing patterns of dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012. Antimicrobials. Australian Dental Journal, 62 1: 52-57. doi:10.1111/adj.12427

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Author Ford, P. J.
Saladine, C.
Zhang, K.
Hollingworth, S. A.
Title Prescribing patterns of dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012. Antimicrobials
Journal name Australian Dental Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1834-7819
0045-0421
Publication date 2017-02-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/adj.12427
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 62
Issue 1
Start page 52
End page 57
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Subject 3500 Dentistry
Abstract Background: The development of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is of global concern. Inappropriate prescribing has the potential to exacerbate this issue. We aimed to examine the patterns of prescribing of antimicrobial medicines by dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012. Methods: Data were collected from Medicare Australia on prescriptions from dental practitioners dispensed to concessional beneficiaries between 2001 and 2012. We examined patterns of use over time. Results: There was an overall increase in number of prescriptions and in dispensed use (standardized by dose and population) of antibiotics and antifungals for the concessional population over the 12-year period. The use of dentally prescribed antibiotics increased 50%. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic accounting for 66% of all prescriptions in 2012. Generally, there was preferential prescribing of the highest dose formulations. The use of the two antifungals increased 30% over the study period with a preference for amphotericin B (74%) rather than nystatin. Conclusions: These data show a concerning increase in prescribing of antibiotics and antifungals by dentists in Australia. It would appear that Australian dentists may not be prescribing these medicines appropriately; however, further research is needed to understand prescribing behaviours and decision-making by dentists.
Formatted abstract
Background: The development of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is of global concern. Inappropriate prescribing has the potential to exacerbate this issue. We aimed to examine the patterns of prescribing of antimicrobial medicines by dental practitioners in Australia from 2001 to 2012.

Methods: Data were collected from Medicare Australia on prescriptions from dental practitioners dispensed to concessional beneficiaries between 2001 and 2012. We examined patterns of use over time.

Results: There was an overall increase in number of prescriptions and in dispensed use (standardized by dose and population) of antibiotics and antifungals for the concessional population over the 12-year period. The use of dentally prescribed antibiotics increased 50%. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic accounting for 66% of all prescriptions in 2012. Generally, there was preferential prescribing of the highest dose formulations. The use of the two antifungals increased 30% over the study period with a preference for amphotericin B (74%) rather than nystatin.

Conclusions:
These data show a concerning increase in prescribing of antibiotics and antifungals by dentists in Australia. It would appear that Australian dentists may not be prescribing these medicines appropriately; however, further research is needed to understand prescribing behaviours and decision-making by dentists.
Keyword Amoxicillin
Antibiotics
Antifungals
Dental prescribing
Medicine use
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Dentistry Publications
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 27 Feb 2017, 16:24:44 EST by Anthony Yeates on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)