Almendravirus: a proposed new genus of rhabdoviruses isolated from mosquitoes in tropical regions of the Americas

Contreras, Maria Angelica, Eastwood, Gillian, Guzman, Hilda, Popov, Vsevolod, Savit, Chelsea, Uribe, Sandra, Kramer, Laura D., Wood, Thomas G., Widen, Steven G., Fish, Durland, Tesh, Robert B., Vasilakis, Nikos and Walker, Peter J. (2017) Almendravirus: a proposed new genus of rhabdoviruses isolated from mosquitoes in tropical regions of the Americas. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 96 1: 100-109. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.16-0403


Author Contreras, Maria Angelica
Eastwood, Gillian
Guzman, Hilda
Popov, Vsevolod
Savit, Chelsea
Uribe, Sandra
Kramer, Laura D.
Wood, Thomas G.
Widen, Steven G.
Fish, Durland
Tesh, Robert B.
Vasilakis, Nikos
Walker, Peter J.
Title Almendravirus: a proposed new genus of rhabdoviruses isolated from mosquitoes in tropical regions of the Americas
Formatted title
Almendravirus: a proposed new genus of rhabdoviruses isolated from mosquitoes in tropical regions of the Americas
Journal name American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9637
1476-1645
Publication date 2017-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4269/ajtmh.16-0403
Open Access Status PMC
Volume 96
Issue 1
Start page 100
End page 109
Total pages 10
Place of publication Deerfield, IL, United States
Publisher American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Language eng
Subject 2405 Parasitology
2725 Infectious Diseases
2406 Virology
Abstract The Rhabdoviridae is a diverse family of negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses, many of which infect vertebrate hosts and are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods. Others appear to be arthropod specific, circulating only within arthropod populations. Herein, we report the isolation and characterization of three novel viruses from mosquitoes collected from the Americas. Coot Bay virus was isolated from Anopheles quadrimaculatus mosquitoes collected in the Everglades National Park, Florida; Rio Chico virus was isolated from Anopheles triannulatus mosquitoes collected in Panama; and Balsa virus was isolated from two pools of Culex erraticus mosquitoes collected in Colombia. Sequence analysis indicated that the viruses share a similar genome organization to Arboretum virus and Puerto Almendras virus that had previously been isolated from mosquitoes collected in Peru. Each genome features the five canonical rhabdovirus structural protein genes as well as a gene encoding a class 1A viroporin-like protein (U1) located between the G and L genes (3′-N-P-M-G-U1-L-5′). Phylogenetic analysis of complete L protein sequences indicated that all five viruses cluster in a unique clade that is relatively deeply rooted in the ancestry of animal rhabdoviruses. The failure of all viruses in this clade to grow in newborn mice or vertebrate cells in culture suggests that they may be poorly adapted to replication in vertebrates.
Formatted abstract
The Rhabdoviridae is a diverse family of negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses, many of which infect vertebrate hosts and are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods. Others appear to be arthropod specific, circulating only within arthropod populations. Herein, we report the isolation and characterization of three novel viruses from mosquitoes collected from the Americas. Coot Bay virus was isolated from Anopheles quadrimaculatus mosquitoes collected in the Everglades National Park, Florida; Rio Chico virus was isolated from Anopheles triannulatus mosquitoes collected in Panama; and Balsa virus was isolated from two pools of Culex erraticus mosquitoes collected in Colombia. Sequence analysis indicated that the viruses share a similar genome organization to Arboretum virus and Puerto Almendras virus that had previously been isolated from mosquitoes collected in Peru. Each genome features the five canonical rhabdovirus structural protein genes as well as a gene encoding a class 1A viroporin-like protein (U1) located between the G and L genes (3′-N-P-M-G-U1-L-5′). Phylogenetic analysis of complete L protein sequences indicated that all five viruses cluster in a unique clade that is relatively deeply rooted in the ancestry of animal rhabdoviruses. The failure of all viruses in this clade to grow in newborn mice or vertebrate cells in culture suggests that they may be poorly adapted to replication in vertebrates.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID R24 AI120942
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 21 Feb 2017, 00:20:20 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)