Assessing socio-economic vulnerability to climate change impacts and environmental hazards in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia

Smith, Erin F., Keys, Noni, Lieske, Scott N. and Smith, Timothy F. (2015) Assessing socio-economic vulnerability to climate change impacts and environmental hazards in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. Geographical Research, 53 4: 451-465. doi:10.1111/1745-5871.12137

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Author Smith, Erin F.
Keys, Noni
Lieske, Scott N.
Smith, Timothy F.
Title Assessing socio-economic vulnerability to climate change impacts and environmental hazards in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia
Journal name Geographical Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1745-5871
1745-5863
Publication date 2015-11-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1745-5871.12137
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 53
Issue 4
Start page 451
End page 465
Total pages 15
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This article systematically reviews and synthesises academic, peer-reviewed literature to assess the state of knowledge concerning socio-economic vulnerability to climate change impacts and environmental hazards in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. It focuses upon empirical research that identifies socio-economic factors associated with vulnerable subpopulations. Using systematic review methods, 35 articles met the inclusion criteria. These articles are analysed according to their general characteristics, the methods used, and the factors reported to be associated with socio-economic vulnerability. This body of evidence reveals that (1) the majority of the knowledge about socio-economic vulnerability in New South Wales and Queensland has only recently emerged; (2) more knowledge has been published about Queensland; and (3) extreme temperature is the most researched environmental hazard. Despite increased research activity over time, the number of factors repeatedly demonstrated to influence socio-economic vulnerability is small. Age, gender, place of residence, and pre-existing illness were the most commonly reported factors, although the influence of these factors upon socio-economic vulnerability is complex. There is scope to extend the empirical research base across a broader range of climate-related hazards and to better link findings from the domains of climate change vulnerability and population health.
Keyword Global change
Indicators
Resource dependency
Sensitivity
Systematic literature review
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Feb 2017, 11:37:40 EST by Scott Lieske on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)