Visualization methods for linking scientific and local knowledge of climate change impacts

Lieske, Scott N., Martin, Kari, Grant, Ben and Baldwin, Claudia (2015). Visualization methods for linking scientific and local knowledge of climate change impacts. In Stan Geertman, Joseph Ferreira, Jr., Robert Goodspeed and John Stillwell (Ed.), Planning Support Systems and Smart Cities (pp. 373-389) Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-18368-8_20


Author Lieske, Scott N.
Martin, Kari
Grant, Ben
Baldwin, Claudia
Title of chapter Visualization methods for linking scientific and local knowledge of climate change impacts
Title of book Planning Support Systems and Smart Cities
Place of Publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-18368-8_20
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Series Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography
ISBN 9783319183671
ISSN 1863-2351
Editor Stan Geertman
Joseph Ferreira, Jr.
Robert Goodspeed
John Stillwell
Volume number 213
Chapter number 20
Start page 373
End page 389
Total pages 17
Total chapters 26
Abstract/Summary Planning support systems for smart cities and spatial planning more broadly must be able to help communities confront the combined effects of climate change: flooding, sea level rise, storm surge, and severe weather events in coastal areas. The goal of this chapter is to extend ideas about the role of geographic visualization in generating a societal response to top-down inaction on changing climate by testing methods and evaluating the effectiveness of geographic information- based tools for developing 3D scenes within a participatory process. The engagement process took place within an Australian coastal community where residential development and infrastructure are vulnerable to flooding, sea level rise and storm surge. This research employed and assessed multiple visual methods including geographic visualization to illustrate the impacts of climate change on the study area. Participant assessment indicated all methods employed were beneficial but 3D visualization was the most effective method for knowledge exchange.
Q-Index Code B1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Feb 2017, 11:34:35 EST by Scott Lieske on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)