Human skeletal muscle plasmalemma alters its structure to change its Ca2+-handling following heavy-load resistance exercise

Cully, Tanya R., Murphy, Robyn M., Roberts, Llion, Raastad, Truls, Fassett, Robert G., Coombes, Jeff S., Jayasinghe, Isuru D. and Launikonis, Bradley S. (2017) Human skeletal muscle plasmalemma alters its structure to change its Ca2+-handling following heavy-load resistance exercise. Nature Communications, 8 14266.1-14266.10. doi:10.1038/ncomms14266

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Author Cully, Tanya R.
Murphy, Robyn M.
Roberts, Llion
Raastad, Truls
Fassett, Robert G.
Coombes, Jeff S.
Jayasinghe, Isuru D.
Launikonis, Bradley S.
Title Human skeletal muscle plasmalemma alters its structure to change its Ca2+-handling following heavy-load resistance exercise
Formatted title
Human skeletal muscle plasmalemma alters its structure to change its Ca2+-handling following heavy-load resistance exercise
Journal name Nature Communications   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2041-1723
Publication date 2017-02-13
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ncomms14266
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Start page 14266.1
End page 14266.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 1600 Chemistry
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
3100 Physics and Astronomy
Abstract High-force eccentric exercise results in sustained increases in cytoplasmic Ca levels ([Ca]), which can cause damage to the muscle. Here we report that a heavy-load strength training bout greatly alters the structure of the membrane network inside the fibres, the tubular (t-) system, causing the loss of its predominantly transverse organization and an increase in vacuolation of its longitudinal tubules across adjacent sarcomeres. The transverse tubules and vacuoles displayed distinct Ca-handling properties. Both t-system components could take up Ca from the cytoplasm but only transverse tubules supported store-operated Ca entry. The retention of significant amounts of Ca within vacuoles provides an effective mechanism to reduce the total content of Ca within the fibre cytoplasm. We propose this ability can reduce or limit resistance exercise-induced, Ca-dependent damage to the fibre by the reduction of [Ca] to help maintain fibre viability during the period associated with delayed onset muscle soreness.
Formatted abstract
High-force eccentric exercise results in sustained increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]cyto), which can cause damage to the muscle. Here we report that a heavy-load strength training bout greatly alters the structure of the membrane network inside the fibres, the tubular (t-) system, causing the loss of its predominantly transverse organization and an increase in vacuolation of its longitudinal tubules across adjacent sarcomeres. The transverse tubules and vacuoles displayed distinct Ca2+-handling properties. Both t-system components could take up Ca2+ from the cytoplasm but only transverse tubules supported store-operated Ca2+ entry. The retention of significant amounts of Ca2+ within vacuoles provides an effective mechanism to reduce the total content of Ca2+ within the fibre cytoplasm. We propose this ability can reduce or limit resistance exercise-induced, Ca2+-dependent damage to the fibre by the reduction of [Ca2+]cyto to help maintain fibre viability during the period associated with delayed onset muscle soreness.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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