Can cold water immersion enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters? An individualized perspective

Schimpchen, Jan, Wagner, Maximilian, Ferrauti, Alexander, Kellmann, Michael, Pfeiffer, Mark and Meyer, Tim (2017) Can cold water immersion enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters? An individualized perspective. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 31 6: 1569-1576. doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000001591

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Author Schimpchen, Jan
Wagner, Maximilian
Ferrauti, Alexander
Kellmann, Michael
Pfeiffer, Mark
Meyer, Tim
Title Can cold water immersion enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters? An individualized perspective
Journal name Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Publication date 2017-01-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001591
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 31
Issue 6
Start page 1569
End page 1576
Total pages 21
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract We investigated whether cold water immersion following intensive training sessions can enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters, taking into account each athlete's individual response pattern. The entire German male Olympic weightlifting national team participated in the study (n=7), ensuring collection of data from elite athletes only. Using a randomized cross-over design, the athletes went through two high intensity training microcycles consisting of five training sessions that were either followed by a cold water immersion or passive recovery. Barbell speed in a snatch pull movement, blood parameters as well as subjective ratings of general fatigue and recovery were assessed throughout the study. Physical performance at two snatch pull intensities (85% 1RM: -0.15% vs. -0.22%, P=0.94; 90% 1RM: -0.7% vs. +1.23%, P=0.25) did not differ significantly (condition x time). While questionnaires revealed a significant decline in ratings of overall recovery (P<0.001) and a significantly higher rating of overall stress (P=0.03) over time, no significant differences between conditions (P=0.14; P=0.98) could be revealed. Similarly, neither of the analyzed blood parameters changed significantly between conditions over time (CK: P=0.53; Urea: P=0.43; Cortisol: P=0.59; Testosterone: P=0.53; Testosterone:Cortisol ratio: P=0.69). In general, CWI did not prove to be an effective tool to enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters over a three day intensive training period. However, even though the group was rather homogeneous with regard to performance, there were considerable inter-subject differences in their response to CWI. It appears that athletes are best advised on a case-by-case basis.
Keyword Onset Muscle Soreness
Exercise
Performance
Symptoms
Damage
Hydrotherapy
Adaptations
Rationale
Blood
Scale
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID IIA1-081901/12-16
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 10 Feb 2017, 15:18:39 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences