Neurological injury in intermediate-risk transcatheter aortic valve implantation

Fanning, Jonathon P., Wesley, Allan J., Walters, Darren L., Eeles, Eamonn M., Barnett, Adrian G., Platts, David G., Clarke, Andrew J., Wong, Andrew A., Strugnell, Wendy E., O'Sullivan, Cliona, Tronstad, Oystein and Fraser, John F. (2016) Neurological injury in intermediate-risk transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Journal of the American Heart Association, 5 11: . doi:10.1161/JAHA.116.004203


Author Fanning, Jonathon P.
Wesley, Allan J.
Walters, Darren L.
Eeles, Eamonn M.
Barnett, Adrian G.
Platts, David G.
Clarke, Andrew J.
Wong, Andrew A.
Strugnell, Wendy E.
O'Sullivan, Cliona
Tronstad, Oystein
Fraser, John F.
Title Neurological injury in intermediate-risk transcatheter aortic valve implantation
Journal name Journal of the American Heart Association   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2047-9980
Publication date 2016-11-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1161/JAHA.116.004203
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 11
Total pages 14
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 2705 Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Abstract Background--The application of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) to intermediate-risk patients is a controversial issue. Of concern, neurological injury in this group remains poorly defined. Among high-risk and inoperable patients, subclinical injury is reported on average in 75% undergoing the procedure. Although this attendant risk may be acceptable in higher-risk patients, it may not be so in those of lower risk. Methods and Results--Forty patients undergoing TAVI with the Edwards SAPIEN-XT™ prosthesis were prospectively studied. Patients were of intermediate surgical risk, with a mean±standard deviation Society of Thoracic Surgeons score of 5.1±2.5% and a EuroSCORE II of 4.8±2.4%; participant age was 82±7 years. Clinically apparent injury was assessed by serial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale assessments, Montreal Cognitive Assessments (MoCA), and with the Confusion Assessment Method. These identified 1 (2.5%) minor stroke, 1 (2.5%) episode of postoperative delirium, and 2 patients (5%) with significant postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Subclinical neurological injury was assessed using brain magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusionweighted imaging (DWI) sequences preprocedure and at 3±1 days postprocedure. This identified 68 new DWI lesions present in 60% of participants, with a median±interquartile range of 1±3 lesions/patient and volumes of infarction of 24±19 lL/lesion and 89±218 μL/patient. DWI lesions were associated with a statistically significant reduction in early cognition (mean ΔMoCA -3.5±1.7) without effect on cognition, quality of life, or functional capacity at 6 months. Conclusions--Objectively measured subclinical neurological injuries remain a concern in intermediate-risk patients undergoing TAVI and are likely to manifest with early neurocognitive changes.
Formatted abstract
Background: The application of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) to intermediate‐risk patients is a controversial issue. Of concern, neurological injury in this group remains poorly defined. Among high‐risk and inoperable patients, subclinical injury is reported on average in 75% undergoing the procedure. Although this attendant risk may be acceptable in higher‐risk patients, it may not be so in those of lower risk.

Methods and Results: Forty patients undergoing TAVI with the Edwards SAPIEN‐XT™ prosthesis were prospectively studied. Patients were of intermediate surgical risk, with a mean±standard deviation Society of Thoracic Surgeons score of 5.1±2.5% and a EuroSCORE II of 4.8±2.4%; participant age was 82±7 years. Clinically apparent injury was assessed by serial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale assessments, Montreal Cognitive Assessments (MoCA), and with the Confusion Assessment Method. These identified 1 (2.5%) minor stroke, 1 (2.5%) episode of postoperative delirium, and 2 patients (5%) with significant postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Subclinical neurological injury was assessed using brain magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI) sequences preprocedure and at 3±1 days postprocedure. This identified 68 new DWI lesions present in 60% of participants, with a median±interquartile range of 1±3 lesions/patient and volumes of infarction of 24±19 μL/lesion and 89±218 μL/patient. DWI lesions were associated with a statistically significant reduction in early cognition (mean ΔMoCA −3.5±1.7) without effect on cognition, quality of life, or functional capacity at 6 months.

Conclusions: Objectively measured subclinical neurological injuries remain a concern in intermediate‐risk patients undergoing TAVI and are likely to manifest with early neurocognitive changes.
Keyword Aortic stenosis
Cerebrovascular disease/stroke
Cognitive impairment
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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