Isolation predicts compositional change after discrete disturbances in a global meta-study

Shackelford, Nancy, Starzomski, Brian M. , Banning, Natasha C. , Battaglia, Loretta L. , Becker, Alistair, Bellingham, Peter J. , Bestelmeyer, Brandon, Catford, Jane A. , Dwyer, John M. , Dynesius, Mats, Gilmour, James, Hallett, Lauren M. , Hobbs, Richard J. , Price, Jodi, Sasaki, Takehiro, Tanner, Edmund V. J. and Standish, Rachel J. (2017) Isolation predicts compositional change after discrete disturbances in a global meta-study. Ecography, 40 11: 1256-1266. doi:10.1111/ecog.02383


Author Shackelford, Nancy
Starzomski, Brian M.
Banning, Natasha C.
Battaglia, Loretta L.
Becker, Alistair
Bellingham, Peter J.
Bestelmeyer, Brandon
Catford, Jane A.
Dwyer, John M.
Dynesius, Mats
Gilmour, James
Hallett, Lauren M.
Hobbs, Richard J.
Price, Jodi
Sasaki, Takehiro
Tanner, Edmund V. J.
Standish, Rachel J.
Title Isolation predicts compositional change after discrete disturbances in a global meta-study
Journal name Ecography   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1600-0587
0906-7590
Publication date 2017-01-19
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ecog.02383
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 40
Issue 11
Start page 1256
End page 1266
Total pages 11
Place of publication Malden, MA, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Abstract Globally, anthropogenic disturbances are occurring at unprecedented rates and over extensive spatial and temporal scales. Human activities also affect natural disturbances, prompting shifts in their timing and intensities. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand and predict the response of ecosystems to disturbance. In this study, we investigated whether there are general determinants of community response to disturbance across different community types, locations, and disturbance events. We compiled 14 case studies of community response to disturbance from four continents, twelve aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem types, and eight different types of disturbance. We used community compositional differences and species richness to indicate community response. We used mixed-effects modeling to test the relationship between each of these response metrics and four potential explanatory factors: regional species pool size, isolation, number of generations passed, and relative disturbance intensity. We found that compositional similarity was higher between pre- and post-disturbance communities when the disturbed community was connected to adjacent undisturbed habitat. The number of generations that had passed since the disturbance event was a significant, but weak, predictor of community compositional change; two communities were responsible for the observed relationship. We found no significant relationships between the factors we tested and changes in species richness. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to search for general drivers of community resilience from a diverse set of case studies. The strength of the relationship between compositional change and isolation suggests that it may be informative in resilience research and biodiversity management.
Keyword Species Richness
Habitat Fragmentation
Life-History
Ecological Stability
Population Viability
Rain-Forests
Biodiversity
Ecosystem
Resilience
Landscape
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DE120102221
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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