Fluid, energy and nutrient recovery via ad libitum intake of different fluids and food

Campagnolo, Nadia, Iudakhina, Elizaveta, Irwin, Christopher, Schubert, Matthew, Cox, Gregory R., Leveritt, Michael and Desbrow, Ben (2017) Fluid, energy and nutrient recovery via ad libitum intake of different fluids and food. Physiology and Behavior, 171 228-235. doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.01.009

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Author Campagnolo, Nadia
Iudakhina, Elizaveta
Irwin, Christopher
Schubert, Matthew
Cox, Gregory R.
Leveritt, Michael
Desbrow, Ben
Title Fluid, energy and nutrient recovery via ad libitum intake of different fluids and food
Journal name Physiology and Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-507X
0031-9384
Publication date 2017-03-15
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.01.009
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 171
Start page 228
End page 235
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Introduction: This study compared the effects of ad libitum consumption of different beverages and foods on fluid retention and nutrient intake following exercise.
Formatted abstract
Introduction: This study compared the effects of ad libitum consumption of different beverages and foods on fluid retention and nutrient intake following exercise.

Methods: Ten endurance trained males (mean ± SD; Age = 25.3 ± 4.9 years, VO2max = 63.0 ± 7.2 mL·kg·min−1) performed four trials employing a counterbalanced, crossover design. Following 60 min of exercise (matched for energy expenditure and fluid loss) participants consumed either water (W1 and W2), a sports drink (Powerade® (P)) or a milk-based liquid meal supplement (Sustagen Sport® (SS)) over a four hour recovery period. Additionally, participants had access to snack foods on two occasions within the first 2 h of recovery on all trials. All beverages and food were consumed ad libitum. Total nutrient intake, urine volume, USG, body weight as well as subjective measures of gastrointestinal tolerance and thirst were obtained hourly. Plasma osmolality was measured pre, post, 1 and 4 h after exercise.

Results: Total fluid volume ingested from food and beverages in W1 (2.28 ± 0.42 L) and P (2.82 ± 0.80 L) trials were significantly greater than SS (1.94 ± 0.54 L). Total urine output was not different between trials (W1 = 644 ± 202 mL, W2 = 602 ± 352 mL, P = 879 ± 751 mL, SS = 466 ± 129 mL). No significant differences in net body weight change was observed between trials (W1 = 0.01 ± 0.28 kg, W2 = 0.08 ± 0.30 kg, P = − 0.02 ± 0.24 kg, SS = − 0.05 ± 0.24 kg). Total energy intake was higher on P (10,179 ± 1484 kJ) and SS (10,577 ± 2210 kJ) compared to both water trials (W1 = 7826 ± 888 kJ, W2 = 7578 ± 1112 kJ).

Conclusion: With the co-ingestion of food, fluid restoration following exercise is tightly regulated and not influenced by the choice of either water, a carbohydrate-electrolyte (sports drink) or a milk-based beverage.
Keyword Dehydration
Energy balance
Recovery
Training
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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