Applying mixture toxicity modelling to predict bacterial bioluminescence inhibition by non-specifically acting pharmaceuticals and specifically acting antibiotics

Neale, Peta A., Leusch, Frederic D. L. and Escher, Beate I. (2017) Applying mixture toxicity modelling to predict bacterial bioluminescence inhibition by non-specifically acting pharmaceuticals and specifically acting antibiotics. Chemosphere, 173 387-394. doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.01.018

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ436429_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 1.48MB 0

Author Neale, Peta A.
Leusch, Frederic D. L.
Escher, Beate I.
Title Applying mixture toxicity modelling to predict bacterial bioluminescence inhibition by non-specifically acting pharmaceuticals and specifically acting antibiotics
Journal name Chemosphere   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-1298
0045-6535
Publication date 2017-04-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.01.018
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 173
Start page 387
End page 394
Total pages 8
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Abstract Pharmaceuticals and antibiotics co-occur in the aquatic environment but mixture studies to date have mainly focused on pharmaceuticals alone or antibiotics alone, although differences in mode of action may lead to different effects in mixtures. In this study we used the Bacterial Luminescence Toxicity Screen (BLT-Screen) after acute (0.5 h) and chronic (16 h) exposure to evaluate how non-specifically acting pharmaceuticals and specifically acting antibiotics act together in mixtures. Three models were applied to predict mixture toxicity including concentration addition, independent action and the two-step prediction (TSP) model, which groups similarly acting chemicals together using concentration addition, followed by independent action to combine the two groups. All non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals had similar EC50 values at both 0.5 and 16 h, indicating together with a QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) analysis that they act as baseline toxicants. In contrast, the antibiotics’ EC50 values decreased by up to three orders of magnitude after 16 h, which can be explained by their specific effect on bacteria. Equipotent mixtures of non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals only, antibiotics only and both non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals and antibiotics were prepared based on the single chemical results. The mixture toxicity models were all in close agreement with the experimental results, with predicted EC50 values within a factor of two of the experimental results. This suggests that concentration addition can be applied to bacterial assays to model the mixture effects of environmental samples containing both specifically and non-specifically acting chemicals.
Keyword Antibiotics
Bacterial toxicity
Concentration addition
Independent action
Pharmaceuticals
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID APP1074775
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 03 Feb 2017, 16:02:56 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)