Ancient, highly conserved proteins from a LUCA with complex cell biology provide evidence in support of the nuclear compartment commonality (NuCom) hypothesis

Staley, James T. and Fuerst, John A. (2017) Ancient, highly conserved proteins from a LUCA with complex cell biology provide evidence in support of the nuclear compartment commonality (NuCom) hypothesis. Research in Microbiology, 168 5: 395-412. doi:10.1016/j.resmic.2017.01.001


Author Staley, James T.
Fuerst, John A.
Title Ancient, highly conserved proteins from a LUCA with complex cell biology provide evidence in support of the nuclear compartment commonality (NuCom) hypothesis
Journal name Research in Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0923-2508
1769-7123
Publication date 2017-06-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.resmic.2017.01.001
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 168
Issue 5
Start page 395
End page 412
Total pages 18
Place of publication Issy les Moulineaux, Cedex, France
Publisher Elsevier Masson
Language eng
Abstract The nuclear compartment commonality (NuCom) hypothesis posits a complex last common ancestor (LUCA) with membranous compartments including a nuclear membrane. Such a LUCA then evolved to produce two nucleated lineages of the tree of life: the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydia superphylum (PVC) within the Bacteria, and the Eukarya. We propose that a group of ancient essential protokaryotic signature proteins (PSPs) originating in LUCA were incorporated into ancestors of PVC Bacteria and Eukarya. Tubulins, ubiquitin system enzymes and sterol-synthesizing enzymes are consistent with early origins of these features shared between the PVC superphylum and Eukarya.
Formatted abstract
The nuclear compartment commonality (NuCom) hypothesis posits a complex last common ancestor (LUCA) with membranous compartments including a nuclear membrane. Such a LUCA then evolved to produce two nucleated lineages of the tree of life: the Planctomycetes–Verrucomicrobia–Chlamydia superphylum (PVC) Bacteria and the Eukarya. We propose that a group of ancient essential protokaryotic signature proteins (PSPs) originating in LUCA were incorporated into ancestors of PVC Bacteria and Eukarya. Tubulins, ubiquitin system enzymes and sterol-synthesizing enzymes are consistent with early origins of these features shared between the PVC superphylum and Eukarya.
Keyword LUCA
PVC superphylum
Planctomycetes
Verrucomicrobia
Origin of eukaryotes
Ancient cell compartmentalization
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Fri, 27 Jan 2017, 14:00:17 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences