Mining Vavilov’s treasure chest of wheat diversity for adult plant resistance to Puccinia triticina

Riaz, Adnan, Athiyannan, Naveenkumar, Periyannan, Sambasivam, Afanasenko, Olga, Mitrofanova, Olga, Aitken, Elizabeth A. B., Lagudah, Evans and Hickey, Lee T. (2017) Mining Vavilov’s treasure chest of wheat diversity for adult plant resistance to Puccinia triticina. Plant Disease, 101 2: 317-323. doi:10.1094/PDIS-05-16-0614-RE


Author Riaz, Adnan
Athiyannan, Naveenkumar
Periyannan, Sambasivam
Afanasenko, Olga
Mitrofanova, Olga
Aitken, Elizabeth A. B.
Lagudah, Evans
Hickey, Lee T.
Title Mining Vavilov’s treasure chest of wheat diversity for adult plant resistance to Puccinia triticina
Formatted title
Mining Vavilov’s treasure chest of wheat diversity for adult plant resistance to Puccinia triticina
Journal name Plant Disease   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0191-2917
1943-7692
Publication date 2017-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1094/PDIS-05-16-0614-RE
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 101
Issue 2
Start page 317
End page 323
Total pages 7
Place of publication St. Paul, MN, United States
Publisher American Phytopathological Society
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Leaf rust (LR) caused by Puccinia triticina, is among the most important diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crops globally. Deployment of cultivars incorporating genetic resistance, such as adult plant resistance (APR) or all-stage resistance, is considered the most sustainable control method. APR is preferred for durability because it places lower selection pressure on the pathogen and is often polygenic. In the search for new sources of APR, here we explored a diversity panel sourced from the N. I. Vavilov Institute of Plant Genetic Resources. Based on DNA marker screening, 83 of the 300 lines were deemed to carry known APR genes; namely, Lr34, Lr46, and Lr67. Interestingly, lines carrying Lr67 were mostly landraces from India and Pakistan, reconfirming the likely origin of the gene. Rapid phenotypic screening using a method that integrates assessment at both seedling and adult growth stages under accelerated growth conditions (i.e., constant light and controlled temperature) identified 50 lines carrying APR. Levels of APR corresponded well with phenotypes obtained in a field nursery inoculated using the same pathotype (R2 = 0.82). The second year of field testing, using a mixture of pathotypes with additional virulence for race-specific APR genes (Lr13 and Lr37), identified a subset of 13 lines that consistently displayed high levels of APR across years and pathotypes. These lines provide useful sources of resistance for future research. A strategy combining rapid generation advance coupled with phenotyping under controlled conditions could accelerate introgression of these potentially novel alleles into adapted genetic backgrounds.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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Created: Tue, 24 Jan 2017, 17:05:31 EST by Adnan Riaz on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation