A pre–post intervention study investigating the confidence and knowledge of health professionals communicating with people with aphasia in a metropolitan hospital

Cameron, Ashley, McPhail, Steven M., Hudson, Kyla, Fleming, Jennifer, Lethlean, Jennifer and Finch, Emma (2017) A pre–post intervention study investigating the confidence and knowledge of health professionals communicating with people with aphasia in a metropolitan hospital. Aphasiology, 31 3: 359-374. doi:10.1080/02687038.2016.1225277


Author Cameron, Ashley
McPhail, Steven M.
Hudson, Kyla
Fleming, Jennifer
Lethlean, Jennifer
Finch, Emma
Title A pre–post intervention study investigating the confidence and knowledge of health professionals communicating with people with aphasia in a metropolitan hospital
Journal name Aphasiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1464-5041
0268-7038
Publication date 2017-03-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02687038.2016.1225277
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 3
Start page 359
End page 374
Total pages 16
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Communication partner training (CPT) is a social intervention approach that can be used to educate and train volunteers, family members, significant others and professionals, in addition to providing skills and strategies for people with aphasia (PWA). This body of CPT research extends the current research in the area by implementing CPT with health professionals (HPs) in using PWA as trainers in a sub-acute care setting, but some previous research in acute care setting has primarily focused on caregivers and volunteers in a community setting.

Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate implementing a CPT programme in an Australian metropolitan hospital by training professionals and utilising PWA as a key component of the training to facilitate “real-time” practical skill acquisition.

Method & Procedures: Fifty-two HPs from multidisciplinary teams (allied health assistants, audiology, dietetics, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, social work and nursing staff in a rehabilitation unit) participated in a pre–post intervention study. HPs completed a questionnaire to collect demographic information, identify current knowledge of aphasia-related communication strategies and ascertain their confidence levels (using a 100-mm visual analogue scale) related to interacting with people with communication impairments and list any strategies/resources that could be used as an adjunct to facilitate exchanges with PWA. These open-ended responses were categorised into four main groups using content analysis. The CPT component, adapted from two programmes run by “Connect—Communication Disability Network” in the United Kingdom, consisted of an educational lecture on communicating with PWA given by a speech-language pathologist and a practical conversation with a person with aphasia. The PWA provided “expert” practical feedback to the professionals participating in the training.

Outcomes & Results: HPs reported mean confidence levels of 46.56 mm (SD = 15.71) prior to training and 75.81 mm (SD = 12.16) post-training, t(51) = 12.479 (p <.001). More HPs were able to identify relevant strategies to assist with communication following the training (median total responses = 52, interquartile range [IQR] = 50–52), than prior to the training (median total responses = 15, IQR = 9–38).

Conclusions: The results provide preliminary evidence to suggest that a CPT programme may be an effective method to increase the confidence and knowledge of communication strategies of HPs, in an acute care setting, when interacting with PWA.
Keyword Aphasia
Health professionals (HPs)
Healthcare setting
Supported conversations
Train the trainer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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