Pathological and clinical analysis of vascular catheterization models in rats, with exploration of interventions to improve clinical tolerance

Allavena, Rachel E., West, Heather, Gale, Joanna and Debrue, Marie (2016) Pathological and clinical analysis of vascular catheterization models in rats, with exploration of interventions to improve clinical tolerance. Toxicologic Pathology, 44 8: 1095-1104. doi:10.1177/0192623316666197


Author Allavena, Rachel E.
West, Heather
Gale, Joanna
Debrue, Marie
Title Pathological and clinical analysis of vascular catheterization models in rats, with exploration of interventions to improve clinical tolerance
Journal name Toxicologic Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1533-1601
0192-6233
Publication date 2016-12-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0192623316666197
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 44
Issue 8
Start page 1095
End page 1104
Total pages 10
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject 2734 Pathology and Forensic Medicine
1312 Molecular Biology
3005 Toxicology
1307 Cell Biology
Abstract Permanent vascular catheterization for intravascular access is one of the most commonly applied techniques used on rodents in pharmacology studies. However, use of the intravascular catheters is complicated by nontolerance due to thromboembolic disease and sepsis. We have undertaken an extensive pathologic and clinical analysis of an intravascular catheterization model in Wistar Han and Sprague-Dawley rats, with a particular focus on carotid artery catheterization with or without jugular vein catheterization, in order to define the pathologic mechanisms behind nontolerance and define clinical end points to ensure maximal animal welfare. Further, we have explored various potential solutions to increase the tolerance of the procedure. In these studies, indwelling catheters were found to cause a high degree of thromboembolic disease with infarction in the brain, cecal tip, and kidneys being the primary causes of nontolerance. Loss of greater than 10% body weight was determined to be the most sensitive indicator of nontolerance and was closely correlated with degree of renal parenchymal loss. Sepsis was noted as a very rare complication, indicating that routine aseptic surgical techniques are adequate for preventing this complication.
Keyword Animal models
Intravascular catheterization models
Preclinical safety assessment
Rat pathology
Welfare
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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