Non-invasive assessment of altered activity following restraint in mice using an automated physiological monitoring system

Spiers, Jereme G., Chen, Hsiao-Jou Chen, Steyn, Frederik J., Lavidis, Nickolas A., Woodruff, Trent M. and Lee, John D. (2017) Non-invasive assessment of altered activity following restraint in mice using an automated physiological monitoring system. Stress, 1-12. doi:10.1080/10253890.2016.1276898

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Author Spiers, Jereme G.
Chen, Hsiao-Jou Chen
Steyn, Frederik J.
Lavidis, Nickolas A.
Woodruff, Trent M.
Lee, John D.
Title Non-invasive assessment of altered activity following restraint in mice using an automated physiological monitoring system
Journal name Stress   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1025-3890
1029-2160
1607-8888
Publication date 2017-01-17
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10253890.2016.1276898
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 9
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Abstract In the laboratory setting, typical endocrine and targeted behavioral tests are limited in their ability to provide a direct assessment of stress in animals housed in undisturbed conditions. We hypothesized that an automated phenotyping system would allow the detection of subtle stress-related behavioral changes well beyond the time-frames examined using conventional methods. In the present study, we have utilized the TSE PhenoMaster system to continuously record basal behaviors and physiological parameters including activity, body weight, food intake, and oxygen consumption in undisturbed and stressed C57Bl/6J male mice (n = 12/group), with a pharmacological intervention using the conventional anxiolytic, diazepam (5 mg kg−1 i.p.; n = 8/group). We observed significant 20-30% reductions in locomotor activity in the dark phase, with subtle reductions in light phase activity for up to 96 hours following a single 2 hour episode of restraint stress. A single administration of diazepam reduced plasma corticosterone concentrations by 30-35% during stress exposure when compared to mice treated with vehicle. This treatment did not result in significantly different locomotor activity compared to vehicle within the first 48 hours following restraint stress. However, diazepam treatment facilitated restoration of locomotor activity at 72 and 96 hours after restraint stress exposure in comparison to vehicle-treated mice. Hence, the use of an automated phenotyping system allows a real time assessment of basal behaviors and empirical metabolism following exposure to restraint stress and demonstrates major and subtle changes in activity persist for several days after stress exposure.
Keyword Automated phenotyping system
Behavior
Corticosterone
Diazepam
Locomotor activity
Phenomaster
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 10 Jan 2017, 01:45:49 EST by Cortina Chen on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences