A tiered multidisciplinary approach to the psychosocial care of adult cancer patients integrated into routine care: the PROMPT study (a cluster-randomised controlled trial)

Turner, Jane, Kelly, Brian, Clarke, David, Yates, Patsy, Aranda, Sanchia, Jolley, Damien, Forbes, Andrew, Chambers, Suzanne, Hargraves, Maryanne and Mackenzie, Lisa (2017) A tiered multidisciplinary approach to the psychosocial care of adult cancer patients integrated into routine care: the PROMPT study (a cluster-randomised controlled trial). Supportive Care in Cancer, 25 1: 17-26. doi:10.1007/s00520-016-3382-0


Author Turner, Jane
Kelly, Brian
Clarke, David
Yates, Patsy
Aranda, Sanchia
Jolley, Damien
Forbes, Andrew
Chambers, Suzanne
Hargraves, Maryanne
Mackenzie, Lisa
Title A tiered multidisciplinary approach to the psychosocial care of adult cancer patients integrated into routine care: the PROMPT study (a cluster-randomised controlled trial)
Journal name Supportive Care in Cancer   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1433-7339
0941-4355
Publication date 2017-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3382-0
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 25
Issue 1
Start page 17
End page 26
Total pages 10
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract A stepped-wedge cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a brief psychosocial intervention for depressed cancer patients, delivered by trained front-line health professionals in routine clinical care.

Nine hundred two patients were assessed across four treatment centres which were allocated in random order from control epoch to intervention epoch. Eligible patients had Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores of 8 or greater. Of eligible patients, 222 were recruited in control epoch and 247 in intervention epoch. Twenty-seven health professionals (HPs) were trained to deliver the psychosocial intervention consisting of up to four sessions, tailored to patient symptoms and distress. HPs participated in group supervision with a psychiatrist. The primary outcome, analysed by intention to treat, was depression measured with the HADS at 10 weeks after receiving the intervention.

At 10-week follow-up, there were no significant differences in HADS score for the 181 patients in control epoch and 177 in intervention epoch (adjusted difference -1.23, 95 % CI -3.81--1.35, p = 0.35). Patients with disease progression who received the intervention experienced significant benefits in unmet practical support needs including care and support, information, and physical and daily living.

A brief psychosocial intervention delivered by front-line oncology health professionals is feasible to deliver but is insufficient as a stand-alone treatment for depression in cancer patients. Psychosocial interventions should be targeted to populations most likely to experience benefit.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: A stepped-wedge cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a brief psychosocial intervention for depressed cancer patients, delivered by trained front-line health professionals in routine clinical care.

Methods: Nine hundred two patients were assessed across four treatment centres which were allocated in random order from control epoch to intervention epoch. Eligible patients had Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores of 8 or greater. Of eligible patients, 222 were recruited in control epoch and 247 in intervention epoch. Twenty-seven health professionals (HPs) were trained to deliver the psychosocial intervention consisting of up to four sessions, tailored to patient symptoms and distress. HPs participated in group supervision with a psychiatrist. The primary outcome, analysed by intention to treat, was depression measured with the HADS at 10 weeks after receiving the intervention.

Results: At 10-week follow-up, there were no significant differences in HADS score for the 181 patients in control epoch and 177 in intervention epoch (adjusted difference −1.23, 95 % CI −3.81––1.35, p = 0.35). Patients with disease progression who received the intervention experienced significant benefits in unmet practical support needs including care and support, information, and physical and daily living.

Conclusion: A brief psychosocial intervention delivered by front-line oncology health professionals is feasible to deliver but is insufficient as a stand-alone treatment for depression in cancer patients. Psychosocial interventions should be targeted to populations most likely to experience benefit.
Keyword Cancer
Depression
Distress
Psychosocial
Training
Treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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