Daylight saving time can decrease the frequency of wildlife-vehicle collisions

Ellis, William A., FitzGibbon, Sean I., Barth, Benjamin J., Niehaus, Amanda C., David, Gwendolyn K., Taylor, Brendan D., Matsushige, Helena, Melzer, Alistair, Bercovitch, Fred B., Carrick, Frank, Jones, Darryl N., Dexter, Cathryn, Gillett, Amber, Predavec, Martin, Lunney, Dan and Wilson, Robbie S. (2016) Daylight saving time can decrease the frequency of wildlife-vehicle collisions. Biology Letters, 12 11: . doi:10.1098/rsbl.2016.0632


Author Ellis, William A.
FitzGibbon, Sean I.
Barth, Benjamin J.
Niehaus, Amanda C.
David, Gwendolyn K.
Taylor, Brendan D.
Matsushige, Helena
Melzer, Alistair
Bercovitch, Fred B.
Carrick, Frank
Jones, Darryl N.
Dexter, Cathryn
Gillett, Amber
Predavec, Martin
Lunney, Dan
Wilson, Robbie S.
Title Daylight saving time can decrease the frequency of wildlife-vehicle collisions
Journal name Biology Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1744-9561
1744-957X
Publication date 2016-11-23
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0632
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 12
Issue 11
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Daylight saving time (DST) could reduce collisions with wildlife by changing the timing of commuter traffic relative to the behaviour of nocturnal animals. To test this idea, we tracked wild koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in southeast Queensland, where koalas have declined by 80% in the last 20 years, and compared their movements with traffic patterns along roads where they are often killed. Using a simple model, we found that DST could decrease collisions with koalas by 8% on weekdays and 11% at weekends, simply by shifting the timing of traffic relative to darkness. Wildlife conservation and road safety should become part of the debate on DST.
Formatted abstract
Daylight saving time (DST) could reduce collisions with wildlife by changing the timing of commuter traffic relative to the behaviour of nocturnal animals. To test this idea, we tracked wild koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in southeast Queensland, where koalas have declined by 80% in the last 20 years, and compared their movements with traffic patterns along roads where they are often killed. Using a simple model, we found that DST could decrease collisions with koalas by 8% on weekdays and 11% at weekends, simply by shifting the timing of traffic relative to darkness. Wildlife conservation and road safety should become part of the debate on DST.
Keyword Wildlife-vehicle collisions
Daylight saving
Wildlife conservation
Conservation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 08 Jan 2017, 10:28:22 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)