Understanding kidney morphogenesis to guide renal tissue regeneration

Little, Melissa H., Combes, Alexander N. and Takasato, Minoru (2016) Understanding kidney morphogenesis to guide renal tissue regeneration. Nature Reviews Nephrology, 12 10: 624-635. doi:10.1038/nrneph.2016.126


Author Little, Melissa H.
Combes, Alexander N.
Takasato, Minoru
Title Understanding kidney morphogenesis to guide renal tissue regeneration
Journal name Nature Reviews Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1759-507X
1759-5061
Publication date 2016-10-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/nrneph.2016.126
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 12
Issue 10
Start page 624
End page 635
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Abstract The treatment of renal failure has seen little change in the past 70 years. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are treated with renal replacement therapy, including dialysis or organ transplantation. The growing imbalance between the availability of donor organs and prevalence of ESRD is pushing an increasing number of patients to undergo dialysis. Although the prospect of new treatment options for patients through regenerative medicine has long been suggested, advances in the generation of human kidney cell types through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells over the past 2 years have brought this prospect closer to delivery. These advances are the result of careful research into mammalian embryogenesis. By understanding the decision points made within the embryo to pattern the kidney, it is now possible to recreate self-organizing kidney tissues in vitro. In this Review, we describe the key decision points in kidney development and how these decisions have been mimicked experimentally. Recreation of human nephrons from human pluripotent stem cells opens the door to patient-derived disease models and personalized drug and toxicity screening. In the long term, we hope that these efforts will also result in the generation of bioengineered organs for the treatment of kidney disease.
Formatted abstract
The treatment of renal failure has seen little change in the past 70 years. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are treated with renal replacement therapy, including dialysis or organ transplantation. The growing imbalance between the availability of donor organs and prevalence of ESRD is pushing an increasing number of patients to undergo dialysis. Although the prospect of new treatment options for patients through regenerative medicine has long been suggested, advances in the generation of human kidney cell types through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells over the past 2 years have brought this prospect closer to delivery. These advances are the result of careful research into mammalian embryogenesis. By understanding the decision points made within the embryo to pattern the kidney, it is now possible to recreate self-organizing kidney tissues in vitro. In this Review, we describe the key decision points in kidney development and how these decisions have been mimicked experimentally. Recreation of human nephrons from human pluripotent stem cells opens the door to patient-derived disease models and personalized drug and toxicity screening. In the long term, we hope that these efforts will also result in the generation of bioengineered organs for the treatment of kidney disease.
Keyword Urology & Nephrology
Urology & Nephrology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 1041277
DK107344-01
DP130102939
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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