Reconstructing a millennial-scale record of flooding in a single valley setting: the 2011 flood-affected Lockyer Valley, SEQ, Australia

Croke, Jacky, Thompson, Christopher, Denham, Robert, Haines, Heather, Sharma, Ashneel and Pietsch, Timothy (2016) Reconstructing a millennial-scale record of flooding in a single valley setting: the 2011 flood-affected Lockyer Valley, SEQ, Australia. Journal of Quaternary Science, 31 8: 936-952. doi:10.1002/jqs.2919


Author Croke, Jacky
Thompson, Christopher
Denham, Robert
Haines, Heather
Sharma, Ashneel
Pietsch, Timothy
Title Reconstructing a millennial-scale record of flooding in a single valley setting: the 2011 flood-affected Lockyer Valley, SEQ, Australia
Journal name Journal of Quaternary Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0267-8179
1099-1417
Publication date 2016-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jqs.2919
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 8
Start page 936
End page 952
Total pages 17
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This paper reconstructs past flooding from a range of settings in Lockyer Creek, a key tributary of the mid-Brisbane River, which experienced extreme flood events in AD 2011 and AD 2013. Optically stimulated luminescence samples (n = 110) were collected from alluvial material preserved in within-channel benches and floodplains. Age distributions from material in the bedrock reaches confirm an event ∼ 300 years ago which stripped the valley alluvium to bedrock. In the unconfined reaches floodplain deposits indicate lateral stability over the past 6000 years. Marked differences in the inundation patterns of the AD 2011 event highlighted changes in downstream channel geometry. The age distribution of alluvium in reaches not inundated during AD 2011 was older, ∼12 000 years, with no preserved evidence of deposition during the past 1000 years. A relatively continuous record of floodplain deposition in reaches which were inundated in AD 2011 identifies a major peak in flood activity also around 300 years ago (∼AD 1730) with five additional peaks occurring at approximately AD 1962, AD 1897, AD 1300, AD 550 and 5400 BC. The main climatic driver of changes in flooding over this timescale is oscillations in El Niño Southern Oscillation and although proxy records are scarce for this region, some correlations with high-resolution records of rainfall variability are apparent.
Keyword Alluvial archives
Extreme events
Flood reconstruction
OSL
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
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Created: Wed, 04 Jan 2017, 01:59:13 EST by Lia Gardiner on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management