Transcranial non-invasive brain stimulation in swallowing rehabilitation following stroke - a review of the literature

Doeltgen, Sebastian H., Bradnam, Lynley V., Young, Jessica A. and Fong, Eric (2015) Transcranial non-invasive brain stimulation in swallowing rehabilitation following stroke - a review of the literature. Physiology and Behavior, 143 1-9. doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.02.025


Author Doeltgen, Sebastian H.
Bradnam, Lynley V.
Young, Jessica A.
Fong, Eric
Title Transcranial non-invasive brain stimulation in swallowing rehabilitation following stroke - a review of the literature
Journal name Physiology and Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-507X
0031-9384
Publication date 2015-05-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.02.025
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 143
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

This descriptive review of the literature outlines the current evidence-base underpinning the potential of transcranial brain stimulation techniques to modulate swallowing function in healthy individuals and in treating post-stroke dysphagia.

Methods

Published research was identified by review of scientific databases (Scopus, Medline Ovid, Science Direct, AMED and Google Scholar) using relevant keywords. In addition, the reference lists of identified articles were scrutinized to identify further potentially relevant papers. Studies employing variants of transcranial magnetic or direct current stimulation for the purpose of modulating swallowing motor cortical excitability in healthy participants or dysphagia following stroke were included. Due to a significant heterogeneity in stimulation paradigms, all included studies were summarised and descriptively analysed in relation to the participants tested, cortical representations targeted by brain stimulation and outcome measures used.

Results

Seventeen studies met inclusion criteria (seven evaluating healthy participants, 10 evaluating participants presenting with post-stroke dysphagia). Cortical stimulation most commonly targeted pharyngeal motor representations (13/17 studies). In the 10 clinical studies, stimulation was applied contralesionally (5/10 studies), ipsilesionally (3/10 studies) or bilaterally (2/10 studies). A range of behavioural and neurophysiological outcome measures demonstrated positive effects on swallowing function across studies.

Conclusion

There is promising proof of concept that non-invasive brain stimulation may provide a useful adjunct to post-stroke swallowing rehabilitation practice. Eventual transition of optimal paradigms into routine clinical practice will be accompanied by practical considerations in relation to local and national frameworks, e.g. the prescription and provision of treatment.
Keyword Transcranial magnetic stimulation
Transcranial direct current stimulation
Swallowing
Dysphagia
Stroke
Neuroplasticity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 03 Jan 2017, 14:32:54 EST by Eric Fong on behalf of School of Medicine