Comparative adoption of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography machines across Australia

Zhang, A., Critchley, S. and Monsour, P. A. (2016) Comparative adoption of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography machines across Australia. Australian Dental Journal, 61 4: 489-496. doi:10.1111/adj.12417


Author Zhang, A.
Critchley, S.
Monsour, P. A.
Title Comparative adoption of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography machines across Australia
Journal name Australian Dental Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1834-7819
0045-0421
Publication date 2016-12-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/adj.12417
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 61
Issue 4
Start page 489
End page 496
Total pages 8
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract The aim of the present study was to assess the current adoption of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiography (PR) machines across Australia.

Information regarding registered CBCT and PR machines was obtained from radiation regulators across Australia. The number of X-ray machines was correlated with the population size, the number of dentists, and the gross state product (GSP) per capita, to determine the best fitting regression model(s).

In 2014, there were 232 CBCT and 1681 PR machines registered in Australia. Based on absolute counts, Queensland had the largest number of CBCT and PR machines whereas the Northern Territory had the smallest number. However, when based on accessibility in terms of the population size and the number of dentists, the Australian Capital Territory had the most CBCT machines and Western Australia had the most PR machines. The number of X-ray machines correlated strongly with both the population size and the number of dentists, but not with the GSP per capita.

In 2014, the ratio of PR to CBCT machines was approximately 7:1. Projected increases in either the population size or the number of dentists could positively impact on the adoption of PR and CBCT machines in Australia.
Formatted abstract
Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the current adoption of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiography (PR) machines across Australia.

Methods: Information regarding registered CBCT and PR machines was obtained from radiation regulators across Australia. The number of X-ray machines was correlated with the population size, the number of dentists, and the gross state product (GSP) per capita, to determine the best fitting regression model(s).

Results: In 2014, there were 232 CBCT and 1681 PR machines registered in Australia. Based on absolute counts, Queensland had the largest number of CBCT and PR machines whereas the Northern Territory had the smallest number. However, when based on accessibility in terms of the population size and the number of dentists, the Australian Capital Territory had the most CBCT machines and Western Australia had the most PR machines. The number of X-ray machines correlated strongly with both the population size and the number of dentists, but not with the GSP per capita.

Conclusions: In 2014, the ratio of PR to CBCT machines was approximately 7:1. Projected increases in either the population size or the number of dentists could positively impact on the adoption of PR and CBCT machines in Australia.
Keyword Cone beam computed tomography
Correlative analysis
Extraoral radiography
Panoramic radiography
X-ray machines
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Dentistry Publications
 
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