Endless forms most beautiful: the evolution of ophidian oral glands, including the venom system, and the use of appropriate terminology for homologous structures

Jackson, Timothy N. W., Young, Bruce, Underwood, Garth, McCarthy, Colin J., Kochva, Elazar, Vidal, Nicolas, van der Weerd, Louise, Nabuurs, Rob, Dobson, James, Whitehead, Daryl, Vonk, Freek J., Hendrikx, Iwan, Hay, Chris and Fry, Bryan G. (2016) Endless forms most beautiful: the evolution of ophidian oral glands, including the venom system, and the use of appropriate terminology for homologous structures. Zoomorphology, 1-24. doi:10.1007/s00435-016-0332-9


Author Jackson, Timothy N. W.
Young, Bruce
Underwood, Garth
McCarthy, Colin J.
Kochva, Elazar
Vidal, Nicolas
van der Weerd, Louise
Nabuurs, Rob
Dobson, James
Whitehead, Daryl
Vonk, Freek J.
Hendrikx, Iwan
Hay, Chris
Fry, Bryan G.
Title Endless forms most beautiful: the evolution of ophidian oral glands, including the venom system, and the use of appropriate terminology for homologous structures
Journal name Zoomorphology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0720-213X
1432-234X
Publication date 2016-12-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00435-016-0332-9
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 24
Total pages 24
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract The differentiated serous-secreting dental glands of caenophidian snakes are diverse in form despite their developmental homology. This variation makes the elucidation of their evolutionary history a complex task. In addition, some authors identify as many as ten discrete types/subtypes of ophidian oral gland. Over the past decade and a half, molecular systematics and toxinology have deepened our understanding of the evolution of these fascinating and occasionally enigmatic structures. This paper includes a comprehensive examination of ophidian oral gland structure and (where possible) function, as well as new data on rictal glands and their associated anatomy. Following this, appropriate use of terminology, especially that pertaining to homologous structures (including the controversial “venom gland” vs “Duvernoy’s gland” debate), is considered. An interpretation of the evolutionary history of the ophidian venom system, drawing on recent results from molecular systematics, toxinology and palaeontology, concludes the paper.
Keyword Anatomy
Evolution
Function
Snake
Terminology
Venom
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 03 Jan 2017, 10:35:50 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)