Two sides to the story: adolescent and parent views on harmful intention in defining school bullying

Thomas, Hannah J., Connor, Jason P., Baguley, Chantelle M. and Scott, James G. (2016) Two sides to the story: adolescent and parent views on harmful intention in defining school bullying. Aggressive Behavior, 43 4: 352-363. doi:10.1002/ab.21694


Author Thomas, Hannah J.
Connor, Jason P.
Baguley, Chantelle M.
Scott, James G.
Title Two sides to the story: adolescent and parent views on harmful intention in defining school bullying
Journal name Aggressive Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1098-2337
0096-140X
Publication date 2016-12-20
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/ab.21694
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 43
Issue 4
Start page 352
End page 363
Total pages 12
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Bullying is defined as repeated negative actions involving a power differential, and intention to harm. There is limited research on harmful intention as a definitional component. This study explored the role of the perpetrator's harmful intention and the target's perception of harmful intention. Some 209 students (M = 14.5 years; 66.5% female) and 447 parents (M = 46.4 years; 86.4% female) were randomly assigned in an online survey. Participants assessed the likelihood of bullying in five hypothetical scenarios (physical, verbal, rumor, exclusion, and cyber) across five intention conditions, that also involved repetition and a power differential. The five intention conditions were: 1) harm intended by perpetrator (I) and perceived as intended to harm by target (I) [II condition]; 2) harm not intended by perpetrator (N) but perceived as intended to harm by target (I) [NI condition]; 3) harm intended by perpetrator (I) but not perceived as intended to harm by target (N) [IN condition]; 4) harm not intended by perpetrator (N) and not perceived as intended to harm by target N [NN condition]; and 5) a control which did not state any actual or perceived harmful intention [C condition]. For students and parents, the perpetrator's harmful intention and the target's perception of harmful intention were important when considering whether a peer interaction constituted bullying. These findings confirm the applicability of the three-part definition of bullying, and highlight the importance of assessing these two dimensions of harmful intention when determining whether a problematic peer interaction should be regarded as bullying.
Keyword Bullying
Cyberbullying
Harmful intention
Definition
Adolescents
Parents
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 21 Dec 2016, 19:43:11 EST by Hannah Jane Thomas on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research