Shear wave elastography reveals different degrees of passive and active stiffness of the neck extensor muscles

Dieterich, Angela V., Andrade, Ricardo J., Le Sant, Guillaume, Falla, Deborah, Petzke, Frank, Hug, François and Nordez, Antoine (2016) Shear wave elastography reveals different degrees of passive and active stiffness of the neck extensor muscles. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 117 1: 1-8. doi:10.1007/s00421-016-3509-5


Author Dieterich, Angela V.
Andrade, Ricardo J.
Le Sant, Guillaume
Falla, Deborah
Petzke, Frank
Hug, François
Nordez, Antoine
Title Shear wave elastography reveals different degrees of passive and active stiffness of the neck extensor muscles
Journal name European Journal of Applied Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1439-6319
1439-6327
Publication date 2016-12-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00421-016-3509-5
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 117
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract The neck extensor muscles contribute to spinal support and posture while performing head and neck motion. Muscle stiffness relates to passive elasticity (support) and active tensioning (posture and movement) of muscle. It was hypothesized that support and motion requirements are reflected in the distribution of stiffness between superficial and deep neck extensor muscles.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The neck extensor muscles contribute to spinal support and posture while performing head and neck motion. Muscle stiffness relates to passive elasticity (support) and active tensioning (posture and movement) of muscle. It was hypothesized that support and motion requirements are reflected in the distribution of stiffness between superficial and deep neck extensor muscles.

Methods: In ten healthy participants, shear modulus (stiffness) of five neck extensor muscles was determined in prone at rest and during isometric head lift at three intensities using shear wave elastography.

Results: Shear modulus differed between muscles (P < 0.001), and was larger for the deeper muscles: (median (interquartile range)) trapezius 7.7 kPa (4.4), splenius capitis 6.5 kPa (2.5), semispinalis capitis 8.9 kPa (2.8), semispinalis cervicis 9.5 kPa (2.5), multifidus 14.9 kPa (1.4). Shear modulus differed between the resting condition and head lift (P < 0.001) but not between levels of head lift intensity.

Conclusion: Shear wave elastography revealed highest passive and active stiffness of the deep neck extensor muscles most close to the spine. The highest active increase of stiffness during the head lift was found in the semispinalis cervicis muscle. The non-invasive, clinically applicable estimates of muscle stiffness have potential for the assessment of muscular changes associated with neck pain/injury.
Keyword Cervical spine
Muscle activation
Neck
Shear modulus
Shear wave elastography
Synergist
Ultrasound
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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