Could ethanol-induced alterations in the expression of glutamate transporters in testes contribute to the effect of paternal drinking on the risk of abnormalities in the offspring?

Kashem, Mohammed Abul, Lee, Aven, Pow, David V., Sery, Omar and Balcar, Vladimir J. (2017) Could ethanol-induced alterations in the expression of glutamate transporters in testes contribute to the effect of paternal drinking on the risk of abnormalities in the offspring?. Medical Hypotheses, 98 57-59. doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2016.11.015

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Author Kashem, Mohammed Abul
Lee, Aven
Pow, David V.
Sery, Omar
Balcar, Vladimir J.
Title Could ethanol-induced alterations in the expression of glutamate transporters in testes contribute to the effect of paternal drinking on the risk of abnormalities in the offspring?
Journal name Medical Hypotheses   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1532-2777
0306-9877
Publication date 2017-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.mehy.2016.11.015
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 98
Start page 57
End page 59
Total pages 3
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract It has been known that a preconception paternal alcoholism impacts adversely on the offspring but the mechanism of the effect is uncertain. Several findings suggest that there are signalling systems in testis that are analogous to those known to be altered by alcoholism in brain. We propose that chronic alcohol affects these systems in a manner similar to that in brain. Specifically, we hypothesise that excessive alcohol may disturb glutamatergic-like signalling in testis by increasing expression of the glutamate transporter GLAST (EAAT1). We discuss ways how to test the hypothesis as well as potential significance of some of the tests as tools in the diagnostics of chronic alcoholism.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
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