Deep sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA of the neonatal oral microbiome: a comparison of breast-fed and formula-fed infants

Al-Shehri, S. S., Sweeney, E. L., Cowley, D. M., Liley, H. G., Ranasinghe, P. D., B. G. Charles,, Shaw, P. N., Vagenas, D., Duley, J. A. and Knox, C. L. (2016) Deep sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA of the neonatal oral microbiome: a comparison of breast-fed and formula-fed infants. Scientific Reports, 6 . doi:10.1038/srep38309


Author Al-Shehri, S. S.
Sweeney, E. L.
Cowley, D. M.
Liley, H. G.
Ranasinghe, P. D.
B. G. Charles,
Shaw, P. N.
Vagenas, D.
Duley, J. A.
Knox, C. L.
Title Deep sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA of the neonatal oral microbiome: a comparison of breast-fed and formula-fed infants
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2016-12-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep38309
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In utero and upon delivery, neonates are exposed to a wide array of microorganisms from various sources, including maternal bacteria. Prior studies have proposed that the mode of feeding shapes the gut microbiota and, subsequently the child’s health. However, the effect of the mode of feeding and its influence on the development of the neonatal oral microbiota in early infancy has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to compare the oral microbiota of healthy infants that were exclusively breast-fed or formula-fed using 16S-rRNA gene sequencing. We demonstrated that the oral bacterial communities were dominated by the phylum Firmicutes, in both groups. There was a higher prevalence of the phylum Bacteroidetes in the mouths of formula-fed infants than in breast-fed infants (p = 0.01), but in contrast Actinobacteria were more prevalent in breast-fed babies; Proteobacteria was more prevalent in saliva of breast-fed babies than in formula-fed neonates (p = 0.04). We also found evidence suggesting that the oral microbiota composition changed over time, particularly Streptococcus species, which had an increasing trend between 4–8 weeks in both groups. This study findings confirmed that the mode of feeding influences the development of oral microbiota, and this may have implications for long-term human health.
Keyword Maternal bacteria
Gut microbiota
Mode of feeding
Oral microbiota
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 16 Dec 2016, 01:58:33 EST by Ms Felicity Lindberg on behalf of School of Pharmacy