From Terroir to Pangkarra: geographical indications of origin and traditional knowledge

Sherman, Brad and Wiseman, Leanne (2016). From Terroir to Pangkarra: geographical indications of origin and traditional knowledge. In Dev S. Ganji (Ed.), Research handbook on intellectual property and geographical indications (pp. 484-507) London, United Kingdom: Edward Elgar. doi:10.4337/9781784719470.00029


Author Sherman, Brad
Wiseman, Leanne
Title of chapter From Terroir to Pangkarra: geographical indications of origin and traditional knowledge
Title of book Research handbook on intellectual property and geographical indications
Place of Publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Edward Elgar
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.4337/9781784719470.00029
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Series Research Handbooks in Intellectual Property
ISBN 9781847201300
Editor Dev S. Ganji
Chapter number 17
Start page 484
End page 507
Total pages 24
Total chapters 18
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract/Summary There has been a marked increase over the last few decades or so in the number of countries which recognise and protect Geographical Indications of origin (GIs). There has also been a steady expansion in the types of things that are protected. While this is not that surprising given the growing interest in slow food and traditional products, what is more surprising, at least at first glance, is the increased attention that has been given to the potential use of GIs to support and promote Indigenous interests. GIs have been associated with Indigenous traditional knowledge in two ways. Firstly, it has been suggested that they could be used as a mechanism to protect and sustain Indigenous interests. This is because, as the WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore noted, some traditional cultural expressions may qualify as goods which could be protected by geographical indications. Secondly, and more ambitiously, it has also been suggested that the regimes used to regulate GIs might be used as a template on which sui generis schemes to protect Indigenous knowledge might be modelled.
Q-Index Code BX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
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Created: Tue, 13 Dec 2016, 15:01:31 EST by Carmen Buttery on behalf of T.C. Beirne School of Law