Effect of cognitive enrichment on behavior, mucosal immunity and upper respiratory disease of shelter cats rated as frustrated on arrival

Gourkow, Nadine and Phillips, Clive J. C. (2016) Effect of cognitive enrichment on behavior, mucosal immunity and upper respiratory disease of shelter cats rated as frustrated on arrival. Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 131 103-110. doi:10.1016/j.prevetmed.2016.07.012

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Gourkow, Nadine
Phillips, Clive J. C.
Title Effect of cognitive enrichment on behavior, mucosal immunity and upper respiratory disease of shelter cats rated as frustrated on arrival
Journal name Preventive Veterinary Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-5877
1873-1716
Publication date 2016-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.prevetmed.2016.07.012
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 131
Start page 103
End page 110
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Acquisition of resources and opportunity to engage in natural behaviors has been shown to reduce frustration-related behaviors and enhance health in nondomestic felids kept in zoos, but little is known about whether there are similar effects in domestic cats living in confinement in animal shelters. Fifteen cats rated as Frustrated during the first hour of confinement to a cage at an animal shelter were assigned to either a Treatment (n = 7) or Control (n = 8) group. Treatment cats were taken from their cages to a separate room four times daily for 10 min each time over a 10 d period, where they took part in training sessions to learn a novel behavior (paw-hand contact with a researcher). Changes in emotional states and mucosal immune response were evaluated over 10 days. Infectious status was determined upon admission and incidence of upper respiratory was determined up to day 40 based on clinical signs. Treated cats were more likely to be rated as Content than Control cats and had greater concentrations of S-IgA (537 μg/g) in feces than Control cats (101 μg/g). Within the Treatment group, cats that responded positively had greater concentrations of S-IgA (925 μg/g) than those that responded negatively (399 μg/g). Control cats were more likely to develop respiratory disease over time compared to cats that received treatment (Hazard Ratio: 2.37, Confidence Interval: 1.35-4.15). It is concluded that there is prima facie evidence that cognitive enrichment of cats exhibiting frustration-related behaviors can elicit positive affect (contentment), stimulate secretion of IgA and reduce incidence of respiratory disease, which is worthy of further study.
Keyword Emotions
Enrichment
Frustration
Human interaction
Respiratory disease
Secretory immunoglobulin A
Shelter cats
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 06 Dec 2016, 12:04:43 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)