The defensive response of the honeybee Apis mellifera

Nouvian, Morgane, Reinhard, Judith and Giurfa, Martin (2016) The defensive response of the honeybee Apis mellifera. Journal of Experimental Biology, 219 22: 3505-3517. doi:10.1242/jeb.143016

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ413953_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 1.29MB 0

Author Nouvian, Morgane
Reinhard, Judith
Giurfa, Martin
Title The defensive response of the honeybee Apis mellifera
Formatted title
The defensive response of the honeybee Apis mellifera
Journal name Journal of Experimental Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0949
1477-9145
Publication date 2016-11-15
Year available 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1242/jeb.143016
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 219
Issue 22
Start page 3505
End page 3517
Total pages 13
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Company of Biologists
Language eng
Abstract Honeybees (Apis mellifera) are insects living in colonies with a complex social organization. Their nest contains food stores in the form of honey and pollen, as well as the brood, the queen and the bees themselves. These resources have to be defended against a wide range of predators and parasites, a task that is performed by specialized workers, called guard bees. Guards tune their response to both the nature of the threat and the environmental conditions, in order to achieve an efficient trade-off between defence and loss of foraging workforce. By releasing alarm pheromones, they are able to recruit other bees to help them handle large predators. These chemicals trigger both rapid and longer-term changes in the behaviour of nearby bees, thus priming them for defence. Here, we review our current understanding on how this sequence of events is performed and regulated depending on a variety of factors that are both extrinsic and intrinsic to the colony. We present our current knowledge on the neural bases of honeybee aggression and highlight research avenues for future studies in this area. We present a brief overview of the techniques used to study honeybee aggression, and discuss how these could be used to gain further insights into the mechanisms of this behaviour.
Formatted abstract
Honeybees (Apis mellifera) are insects living in colonies with a complex social organization. Their nest contains food stores in the form of honey and pollen, as well as the brood, the queen and the bees themselves. These resources have to be defended against a wide range of predators and parasites, a task that is performed by specialized workers, called guard bees. Guards tune their response to both the nature of the threat and the environmental conditions, in order to achieve an efficient trade-off between defence and loss of foraging workforce. By releasing alarm pheromones, they are able to recruit other bees to help them handle large predators. These chemicals trigger both rapid and longer-term changes in the behaviour of nearby bees, thus priming them for defence. Here, we review our current understanding on how this sequence of events is performed and regulated depending on a variety of factors that are both extrinsic and intrinsic to the colony. We present our current knowledge on the neural bases of honeybee aggression and highlight research avenues for future studies in this area. We present a brief overview of the techniques used to study honeybee aggression, anddiscuss how these could be used to gain further insights into the mechanisms of this behaviour.
Keyword Aggression
Alarm pheromones
Defence
Honeybee
Neurobiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 06 Dec 2016, 10:55:16 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)