Maintaining a healthy BMI: data from a 16-year study of young Australian women

Brown, Wendy J., Kabir, Enamul, Clark, Bronwyn K. and Gomersall, Sjaan R. (2016) Maintaining a healthy BMI: data from a 16-year study of young Australian women. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 51 6: e165-e178. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2016.09.007


Author Brown, Wendy J.
Kabir, Enamul
Clark, Bronwyn K.
Gomersall, Sjaan R.
Title Maintaining a healthy BMI: data from a 16-year study of young Australian women
Journal name American Journal of Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-2607
0749-3797
Publication date 2016-12-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.09.007
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 51
Issue 6
Start page e165
End page e178
Total pages 14
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2713 Epidemiology
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Introduction: The aims of this prospective cohort study were to examine 16-year trajectories of weight and BMI in young adult women who had a healthy BMI in 1996 and determinants of remaining in the healthy BMI category.
Formatted abstract
Introduction: The aims of this prospective cohort study were to examine 16-year trajectories of weight and BMI in young adult women who had a healthy BMI in 1996 and determinants of remaining in the healthy BMI category.

Methods: A total of 4,881 women with healthy BMI at baseline and either healthy, overweight, or obese BMI at 16-year follow-up reported their weight, height, health, and health behaviors in six surveys of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health between 1996 (aged 18–23 years) and 2012 (aged 34–39 years). Determinants of BMI maintenance were estimated using binary logistic regression and generalized estimating equations in 2015.

Results: Almost 60% remained in the healthy BMI category from 1996 to 2012, (mean weight gain, 0.19 kg/year), 29% transitioned to overweight BMI (0.83 kg/year), and 11.6% transitioned to obese (1.73 kg/year). The mean rates of annual weight gain in each group were consistent over time. Only three factors (low alcohol, moderate/high physical activity, having a university degree) were positively associated with maintaining a healthy BMI. Additional behavioral factors (smoking, high sitting time, energy intake, dieting, takeaway food, and use of oral contraceptives), as well as blue collar occupation, separation/divorce/widowhood, and major illness were negatively associated with BMI maintenance.

Conclusions: To prevent the transition from healthy to overweight/obese BMI, weight gain must be limited to <0.5 kg/year. Women with healthy BMI, but with higher rates of weight gain in their early 20s, could be identified by health professionals for assistance with prevention of becoming overweight/obese.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Medicine, General & Internal
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
General & Internal Medicine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 569940
APP1057608
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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