Geographical disparity in breast reconstruction following mastectomy has reduced over time

Dasgupta, Paramita, Youl, Philippa H., Pyke, Christopher, Aitken, Joanne F. and Baade, Peter D. (2016) Geographical disparity in breast reconstruction following mastectomy has reduced over time. ANZ Journal of Surgery, 87 11: E183-E187. doi:10.1111/ans.13710


Author Dasgupta, Paramita
Youl, Philippa H.
Pyke, Christopher
Aitken, Joanne F.
Baade, Peter D.
Title Geographical disparity in breast reconstruction following mastectomy has reduced over time
Journal name ANZ Journal of Surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1445-2197
1445-1433
Publication date 2016-08-04
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ans.13710
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 87
Issue 11
Start page E183
End page E187
Total pages 5
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Abstract Breast reconstruction (BR) following mastectomy for breast cancer has been shown to improve quality of life and body image; however, there is significant geographic variation in BR rates. We explored factors associated with BR following mastectomy.

This is a population-based data linkage study consisting of cancer registry records linked to hospital inpatient episodes for 4104 women aged 20 years and over-diagnosed with a first primary invasive localized stage breast cancer between 1997 and 2012 in Queensland, Australia, who underwent a mastectomy. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model predictors of BR.

Overall, 481 women (11.7%) underwent reconstruction. Proportions increased over time and were higher for younger women. Younger age, more recent diagnosis, living in high or very high accessibility areas or less disadvantaged areas, smaller tumours and attending a private or high-volume hospital independently increased the odds of reconstruction. The geographical disparity reduced significantly over time.

Geographical barriers to accessing BR have reduced; however, continued monitoring and further research to inform strategies to further reduce subgroup disparities remain a priority.
Formatted abstract
Background: Breast reconstruction (BR) following mastectomy for breast cancer has been shown to improve quality of life and body image; however, there is significant geographic variation in BR rates. We explored factors associated with BR following mastectomy.

Methods: This is a population-based data linkage study consisting of cancer registry records linked to hospital inpatient episodes for 4104 women aged 20years and over-diagnosed with a first primary invasive localized stage breast cancer between 1997 and 2012 in Queensland, Australia, who underwent a mastectomy. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model predictors of BR.

Results: Overall, 481 women (11.7%) underwent reconstruction. Proportions increased over time and were higher for younger women. Younger age, more recent diagnosis, living in high or very high accessibility areas or less disadvantaged areas, smaller tumours and attending a private or high-volume hospital independently increased the odds of reconstruction. The geographical disparity reduced significantly over time.

Conclusion: Geographical barriers to accessing BR have reduced; however, continued monitoring and further research to inform strategies to further reduce subgroup disparities remain a priority.
Keyword Breast cancer
Healthcare disparities
Mastectomy
Reconstructive surgical procedure
Trends
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 1054038
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes ePUB PMCID: 27490767 Mater UQ Affiliated: Pyke

 
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Created: Thu, 01 Dec 2016, 21:17:38 EST by Julia McCabe on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)