Measuring self-perceptions of creative identity: a cross-cultural comparison of the creative identities of pre-service music teachers in the US and Australia

Randles, Clint and Ballantyne, Julie (2016) Measuring self-perceptions of creative identity: a cross-cultural comparison of the creative identities of pre-service music teachers in the US and Australia. Music Education Research, 1-11. doi:10.1080/14613808.2016.1249360


Author Randles, Clint
Ballantyne, Julie
Title Measuring self-perceptions of creative identity: a cross-cultural comparison of the creative identities of pre-service music teachers in the US and Australia
Journal name Music Education Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1461-3808
1469-9893
Publication date 2016-11-29
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14613808.2016.1249360
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the creative musical identities of pre-service music education students in the US and Australia. This work builds on prior work that has employed similar procedures with pre-service music teachers (PSMTs) in England and Finland. As in prior research, the creative identity in music (CIM) measure was utilised with both the US and Australian PSMT populations (N = 298). Items of CIM relate to music-making activities often associated with creativity in music education in the literature, including composition, improvisation, and popular music performance. Results suggest that the CIM is a valid tool for measuring creative identity as defined by the researchers. Furthermore, while both populations of pre-service teachers are similarly willing to allow for creativity in the classroom, as measured by CIM Sub-Scale #3, research findings suggest that Australian PSMTs indicate a stronger degree of creative music-making self-efficacy (p < .0001), value the areas of creative identity as measured by CIM to a significantly greater extent (p < .0001), and value the use of popular music listening/performing within the learning environment to a significantly greater extent (p < .0001) than US PSMTs.
Keyword Creativity
Popular music
Composition
Improvisation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 29 November 2016

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Wed, 30 Nov 2016, 23:59:16 EST by Dr Julie Ballantyne on behalf of School of Music