The association between ambient air pollution and selected adverse pregnancy outcomes in China: a systematic review

Jacobsa, Milena, Zhang, Guicheng, Chen, Shu, Mullins, Ben, Bell, Michelle, Jin, Lan, Guo, Yuming, Huxley, Rachel and Pereira, Gavin (2016) The association between ambient air pollution and selected adverse pregnancy outcomes in China: a systematic review. Science of the Total Environment, 579 1179-1192. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.100


Author Jacobsa, Milena
Zhang, Guicheng
Chen, Shu
Mullins, Ben
Bell, Michelle
Jin, Lan
Guo, Yuming
Huxley, Rachel
Pereira, Gavin
Title The association between ambient air pollution and selected adverse pregnancy outcomes in China: a systematic review
Journal name Science of the Total Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0048-9697
1879-1026
Publication date 2016-11-29
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.100
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 579
Start page 1179
End page 1192
Total pages 14
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject 2305 Environmental Engineering
2304 Environmental Chemistry
2311 Waste Management and Disposal
2310 Pollution
Abstract The association between exposure to ambient air pollution and respiratory or cardiovascular endpoints is well-established. An increasing number of studies have shown that this exposure is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, the majority of research has been undertaken in high-income western countries, with relatively lower levels of exposure. There is now a sufficient number of studies to warrant an assessment of effects in China, a relatively higher exposure setting. We conducted a systematic review of 25 studies examining the association between ambient air pollution exposure and adverse pregnancy outcomes (lower birth weight, preterm birth, mortality, and congenital anomaly) in China, published between 1980 and 2015. The results indicated that sulphur dioxide (SO) was more consistently associated with lower birth weight and preterm birth, and that coarse particulate matter (PM) was associated with congenital anomaly, notably cardiovascular defects.
Formatted abstract
The association between exposure to ambient air pollution and respiratory or cardiovascular endpoints is well-established. An increasing number of studies have shown that this exposure is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, the majority of research has been undertaken in high-income western countries, with relatively lower levels of exposure. There is now a sufficient number of studies to warrant an assessment of effects in China, a relatively higher exposure setting. We conducted a systematic review of 25 studies examining the association between ambient air pollution exposure and adverse pregnancy outcomes (lower birth weight, preterm birth, mortality, and congenital anomaly) in China, published between 1980 and 2015. The results indicated that sulphur dioxide (SO2) was more consistently associated with lower birth weight and preterm birth, and that coarse particulate matter (PM10) was associated with congenital anomaly, notably cardiovascular defects.
Keyword Pollution
Low birth weight
Preterm birth
Mortality
Congenital anomaly
Birth defects
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID NIEHS R01ES019587
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 30 Nov 2016, 17:10:58 EST by Yuming Guo on behalf of School of Public Health