Improvements in attention and decision-making following combined behavioral training and brain stimulation

Filmer, Hannah L., Varghese, Elizabeth, Hawkins, Guy E., Mattingley, Jason B. and Dux, Paul E. (2016) Improvements in attention and decision-making following combined behavioral training and brain stimulation. Cerebral Cortex, 27 7: 3675-3682. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhw189


Author Filmer, Hannah L.
Varghese, Elizabeth
Hawkins, Guy E.
Mattingley, Jason B.
Dux, Paul E.
Title Improvements in attention and decision-making following combined behavioral training and brain stimulation
Journal name Cerebral Cortex   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1047-3211
1460-2199
Publication date 2016-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/cercor/bhw189
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 27
Issue 7
Start page 3675
End page 3682
Total pages 8
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Abstract In recent years there has been a significant commercial interest in ‘brain training’ – massed or spaced practice on a small set of tasks to boost cognitive performance. Recently, researchers have combined cognitive training regimes with brain stimulation to try and maximize training benefits, leading to task-specific cognitive enhancement. It remains unclear, however, whether the performance gains afforded by such regimes can transfer to untrained tasks, or how training and stimulation affect the brain's latent information processing dynamics. To examine these issues, we applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the prefrontal cortex while participants undertook decision-making training over several days. Anodal, relative to cathodal/sham tDCS, increased performance gains from training. Critically, these gains were reliable for both trained and untrained tasks. The benefit of anodal tDCS occurred for left, but not right, prefrontal stimulation, and was absent for stimulation delivered without concurrent training. Modeling revealed left anodal stimulation combined with training caused an increase in the brain's rate of evidence accumulation for both tasks. Thus tDCS applied during training has the potential to modulate training gains and give rise to transferable performance benefits for distinct cognitive operations through an increase in the rate at which the brain acquires information.
Keyword Decision-making
Evidence Accumulation
tDCS
Training
Transfer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 24 Nov 2016, 21:46:15 EST by Kirstie Asmussen on behalf of School of Music