Family members’ needs and experiences of driving disruption over time following an acquired brain injury: an evolving issue

Liang, Phyllis, Gustafsson, Louise, Liddle, Jacki and Fleming, Jennifer (2016) Family members’ needs and experiences of driving disruption over time following an acquired brain injury: an evolving issue. Disability And Rehabilitation, 39 14: 1-10. doi:10.1080/09638288.2016.1196397


Author Liang, Phyllis
Gustafsson, Louise
Liddle, Jacki
Fleming, Jennifer
Title Family members’ needs and experiences of driving disruption over time following an acquired brain injury: an evolving issue
Journal name Disability And Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0963-8288
1464-5165
Publication date 2016-06-15
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09638288.2016.1196397
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 39
Issue 14
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 2742 Rehabilitation
Abstract Purpose: Family members often assume the role of driver for individuals who are not driving post-acquired brain injury (ABI). Given that return to driving can be unpredictable and uncertain, the impact of driving disruption on family members may vary at different stages post-injury. This study aims to understand the needs and experiences of family members over time during driving disruption following an ABI.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Family members often assume the role of driver for individuals who are not driving post-acquired brain injury (ABI). Given that return to driving can be unpredictable and uncertain, the impact of driving disruption on family members may vary at different stages post-injury. This study aims to understand the needs and experiences of family members over time during driving disruption following an ABI.

Method: A qualitative prospective longitudinal research design was used with semi-structured interviews at recruitment to study, 3 and 6 months later.

Results: Fourteen family members completed 41 interviews. The longitudinal data revealed four phases of driving disruption: (1) Wait and see, (2) Holding onto a quick fix, (3) No way out, and (4) Resolution and adjustment. The phases described a process of building tension and a need for support and resolution over time.

Conclusions: Holding onto a quick fix is a pivotal phase whereby supports, such as engagement in realistic goal setting, are essential to facilitate family members’ resolution of driving disruption issues. Family members who see no way out might not actively seek help and these points to a need for long-term and regular follow-ups. Future research can explore ways to support family members at these key times.
Keyword Automobile driving
Brain injury
Caregiver
Family
Lived experiences
Quality of life
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 27 Jun 2016

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 24 Nov 2016, 02:07:44 EST by Kirstie Asmussen on behalf of School of Music